DOUGLAS DIRECTORY

A STUDY OF THE BUSINESS, SOCIAL,AND CIVIC HISTORY

OF THE

VILLAGE OF

DOUGLAS MICHIGAN

11

Time line from an early work by the late Charles Lorenz used in a program presented to the Saugatuck -Douglas Historical Society program, Jan 13, 1993, on file in the minutes of the S.D.H.S.

1846 Robert McDonald and William Scovill are the first settlers on the south side of the Kalamazoo River. Land acquired from Michael B. Spencer Spencer was proprietor of Saugatuck's first sawmill. Mrs. McDonald becomes the first school teacher of Douglas

1851 Johnathan Wade comes from Singapore and builds a sawmill with John Mead. In 1848, Wade was partners with Asa Bowker, at Singapore, where they defaulted on a sawmill.

1852 First general store opened by William Bush

1853 Jan. 9, First white child born in Douglas --Frank Wade, son of Jonathan Wade

1855 William F. Dutcher comes to Douglas and Jonathan Wade sells sawmill to him

1857 The Village of Douglas founded by William F. Dutcher and Stickney

1860 David W. Wiley and B.S. Williams buy 100 acres of land in Douglas for fruit farm

1860 April 13, Jonathan Wade plats Dudleyville south of Center Street.

1860 Michael Brown Spencer builds home. Sold in 1933 to Mr and Mrs Charles Koning and converted to the Tara Restaurant

1861 John Ryan became resident of Douglas.

1862 The first church organized in Douglas was a non- denominational congregation

1862 Sawmill built by Hollister F. Marsh, later sold to Carpenter and Conger.

1863 Jonathan Wade builds Douglas House. It burns in February 1934 and the roof is reconstructed

1864 Shoe and Harness leather tannery built on Tannery Creek by Daniel Gerber.

1864 Douglas Business Directory:

William F. Dutcher, proprietor of steam sawmill

Hollister F. Marsh, Merchant and shingle mill proprietor

D. Porter, Lumber inspector

H. Stone, Shoemaker

Jonathan Wade, Hotel Proprietor

M. Dye, Sawyer

J. Ryan

1864 Drugstore opened by Daniel McLean

1865 John and Eliza Kibby, with son, Frank (1861-1896), come to Douglas

1866 Second School in Douglas built on the corner of Center and Union Streets.

1866 M. B. Spencer and wife deed land for Douglas Union School for $300

1866 First meeting of Dutcher Lodge #193 F.A. & M. held, presided over by Thomas B. Dutcher (1836-1903)

1866 Store founded by J. Gerber and Co.

1867 Douglas Union School built for $5000

1867 Wiley and Williams set large peach orchards, dealers in fruit and fruit trees

1868 David Roberts and Daniel Kelly run Douglas House

1869 Bridge connecting Douglas and Saugatuck

1869 Gerber tannery burns down and is rebuilt by Daniel T. and Joseph Gerber to process sole leather

1869 G. C. Maxson and Andrew Weatherwax run Douglas House and give it a thorough renovation

1869 OCTOBER 23, Manville starts dairy.

1870 Jobn Ryan buys Douglas House from Maxson and Weatherwax

1870 Collier and Ensign open Drug store

1870 Church built in Douglas that later became the Methodist- Episcopal Church

1870 June 11, Robb and Graham build fire proof kiln

1870 June 16 A. Robb and C. W. Graham form partnership in furniture store, planing shop and kiln, became Robb, Graham and Co., on May 20, 1871 and new store built

1870 August 27, Homer Manvill sold dairy business and stock of twelve cows

1870 John Kirby (1830-1882 ) is harness maker in Douglas. Douglas Village Clerk for 7 years, to 1878

1870 September 3, Dyer C. Putnam buys J. Gerber's store on S. W. corner of Center and Spring Streets, burns in 1902

1870 Crawford McDonald opens a new furniture store in Douglas in the building formerly occupied by L. D. Buck

1870 October 14, Village of Douglas incorporated

1870 October 22, Randolph and Ed Densmore sell interest in T. Gray and Co. sawmill

1870 October 22, H. Lee sells blacksmith shop to Edward Takken

1871 J. S. Payne buys gristmill from Crawford McDonald

1871 Dr. Asa Goodrich builds home and drug store

1871 W. Chadbourne runs Douglas House

1872 February 6, Congregational Church Society begun in Douglas 1872 May 19, Douglas Methodist Episcopal Church dedicated

1872 Vinegar Factory built at the north end of Union Street

1873 December 5, Alexander McRae and Henry Hibbard Stimson, physicians, dissolved partnership 1873 Densmore and Kenter start shingle mill

1873 Brick kiln and yard by Jonathan and Nelson Wade

1874 Jervis and James Kibby buy Douglas House

1874 J. S. Payne flouring mill partially destroyed by fire, killing Payne's brother and his young daughter and injuring three others

1875 Masonic Lodge built at a cost of 51,400

1876 Twenty members of butcher Lodge, No. 193 demit and form Saugatuck Lodge No. 328

1876 J. E. Hutchinson 7 Bro. grocery started by Jesse E., and Monta Hutchinson. Monta leaves shortly after.

1877 Daniel Gerber sells tannery to C. C. Wallin and Co.

1877 June 7, Douglas Weekly News was first published by C. M. Window and never published a second issue. Sold to Commercial

1877 June 22, Gray & Grouse shut down sawmill

1877 Hutchinson Bros and Co. buy gristmill from John Payne

1878 The Central Store begun by Henry A. McDonald (1850 -1926)

1878 William and Joshua Weed buy basket factory from Robert Reid and move machinery to site of Jonathan Wades old sawmill

1879 Daniel McLean sells drugstore to C. E and Henry Bird

1879 Ebmeyer and Nies buy sawmill from Gray and Crouse

1880 November, flour and feed grist mill sold to T. B. butcher and Robert Moore, formerly owned by J. S. Payne

1880 Robert Moore builds cold storage fruit locker

1880 C. C. Wallin & Sons sell tannery and move to Fremont, Michigan

1881 Henry Bird, Jr. opens drug store in Douglas

1883 First Congregational Church Society church begun

1884 August 10, First Congregational Church dedicated, 32' x 50' seating 200 people, Hugh E. Graham carpenter

1885 Douglas Weekly Herald appeared and runs for seventeen years when it was sold to the Commercial 1885 George Thomas builds home, operated wagon shop to 1900

1886 Rosemont built by Samuel Wilson Bryan

1887 James Gustavus Wark (1849 -1930) moves to Douglas

1888 Isadore Schuman comes from Chicago and starts a dress shop

1889 Slaughter house built by Charles Powers

1890 Sarah M. Kirby (1861-1951) builds home at 294 W. Center Street. This becomes Douglas Community Hospital in 1931 to 1957.

1891 Dutcher and Moore gristmill burns . T. B. Dutcher moves to Cadillac

1891 Owners of record of E. E. Weed & Co. are E. E . Weed, Frank Kirby, and Frank Wade

1894 F. E. Weed advertises fruit packages of all kinds, lumber, doors, sash, blinds, moldings, scroll sawing, door and window frames, building materials, etc., planing, matching, willing, ceiling and resawing done to order

1895 January 21, the Chicora founders in Lake Michigan and debris washed ashore at Douglas

1895 Frank Kirby died and part of his interest in E. E. Weed and Co. bought by D. Milton Gerber

1896 Henry Bird, Jr. has sold his drug store to a. R Johnson of Allegan. He has been engaged in the business the last fifteen years

1899 Resort started by Mrs. Trumbull

1899 Resort started by Capt. Robert Reid

1900 Wagon Shop of George I1. Thomas sold when he moved to Laketown

1902 Dutcher Lodge # 193 F. A. & M. enlarge their meeting quarters with addition on the east side doubling its size, in cooperation with the Village of Douglas who leases the first floor for ninety years 1902 Dyer C. Putnams store on the corner of Center and Spring Streets is destroyed by fire.

1902 The Peoples Store built by Louis Winfred McDonald on the corner of Center and Spring Streets 1903 James Wark buys into E. E. Weed & Co.

1907 Carl Sandburg speaks in Douglas

1907 Douglas Beach created from three properties on the Lakeshore

1908 Hardware store begun by Frank & Jennie Van Syckel

1910 Red Dock built at the west end of Union Street on the river

1910 Mr and Mrs. Frederick Schultz run Douglas Douse

1927 April 29, the E. E., Weed & Co. basket factory burns to the ground, one of the largest employers in the area

<<<<<<<<End of Mr Lorenz Work ~

 

VILLAGE OF DOUGLAS

LAND TRANSFERS & CONSTRUCTION

10-17-68 Property Sold.-Robert Helmer has sold his fruit farm in Douglas of 57 acres to Mr. Hewitt of Barry Co. for $6,500

11-21-68 Several dwelling houses have been built on Wileys' addition to this village, with others in course of erection, and as it is a very desirable building locality, we expect before this time another year to see quite a village in that place

4-3-69 Mr. W. S. Roberts a few days since, sold one acre of land adjoining his peach orchard,to Mr. Seger of Manlius Township, for $500. We understand that Mr. Seger intends moving to this place in a few days, and will erect a dwelling house upon his purchase during the summer

June 1870 M. B. Spencer sold 28 acres for $5600, instead of $2600 as was reported last week. he also sold Block #1,Spencers Addition to Douglas, for $1150. Ms Susan Davis bought 10 acres of Mr. Spencer for $2000

7-16-70 During the last 15 months 36 new buildings have been finished in Douglas, and many more are now going up.

7-30-70 M.B. Spencer sold to T. K. Firman village lot # 1, in block 8, Mr. Firman has the timber and lumber on the lot end will erect a house thereon at once.

5-27-71 Dr. A.C. Goodrich has bought the unfinished house owned by Wm. Woodhull on Center St., and is hauling lumber for finishing it. We understand that the doctor has concluded to practice in Douglas and vicinity.

10-19-77 J. S. Payne is building an addition to his house. The boss carpenter J. Refiner is doing the work. 10-19-77 Geo. Sams has bought the Kleeman farm and is erecting a dwelling house, 11-9-77 D, W. Wiley has sold his farm to Daniel Gerber. It is among the probabilities that Mr Wiley may leave us before long.

11-16-77 Anthony Slack is building a new house and barn

 

BUSINESS AND REFERENCES

4-3-69 Mr. Collier is also getting the timber and material together for the erection of a building for his Drug Store upon the land lately purchased by him on the corner of Center and Washington Sts.

10-1-70 Polls will be open at 9 a.m. in Woodhulls Store, Douglas, D.C. Putnam clerk

1-21-71 There is strong talk of boring for salt here

5-27-71 Dr. A.C. Goodrich has bought the unfinished house owned by Wm. Woodhull on Center St., and is hauling lumber for finishing it. We understand that the doctor has concluded to practice in Douglas and vicinity.

10-17-77 On Wed last the dwelling house of Geo. Billings was destroyed by fire about 11 o'clock a.m. The wind was blowing a perfect gale and the family barely escaped with their lives. They saved neither furniture or clothing. The house and contents were insured for $600. After the Billings House was burned, another alarm of fire was sounded. Sparks from Paynes' Mill had caught under a locksmith shop on Moores' Mill yard, but made but little headway awing to the dampness of the weather. No damage was done.

7-18-79 The plank and timber are on the ground for a side walk from Hutchinson Bro and Co s' dock in Douglas up into town.

7-30-80 Commissioner Spencer is doing a nice job of road work in Douglas. He is making a grade from the corner at H. Takken's place down past the Woodhull building. An open ditch has been opened along the -south side down to Woodhull corner, and from there down to the corner of J. Collins place a blind ditch of either stone or wood will be put in.

6-3-81-See Common Council May 31st 1881 [improvements, sidewalks locations, and business men]

12-30-81 There are prospects of a brick yard being opened in Douglas in the spring. 2-17-82 Bane and DeVries of Holland talk of moving Cheer mill from that place to Douglas

3-31-82 There are parties in Douglas making arrangements for putting in a veneering machine

 

LOCATIONS

5-30-71 Motion to build sidewalk on the w. side of the St. running s. from the church to the s.e. corner of C McDonalds lot --Common Council

 

7-30-80 Commissioner Spencer is doing a nice job of road work in Douglas . He is making a grade from the corner at H. Takken's place down past the Woodhull building. An open ditch has been opened along the south side down to Woodhull corner, and from there down to the corner of J. Collins place a blind ditch of either stone or wood will be put in.

6-3-81 -See Common Council May 31st 1881 [improvements, sidewalks locations, and business men] 7-16-70 The ladies of the M. E. Church will give an Ice Cream Festival next Tuesday evening in the home lately occupied by Dudley Wade [Douglas]

5-21-80 Octagon House Douglas, "The Golden Shore" Douglas singers

 

CHURCHES

June 1870 Over $2300 have been raised toward building the new M.E. Church. Only $200 are now wanting before building can begin.

 

FUNDRAISING - BRIDGE

9-18-69 The people of Douglas have decided to hold a series of dances to obtain money to build a sidewalk from the bridge to the Union School House. The first party was given last Wednesday evening being well attended.

VILLAGE INCORPORATION

7-13-70The people of Douglas met at the Douglas House and took measures to incorporate the Village

10-1-70 Douglas wants to be incorporated as a Village, all of Sec. 16 plus some other land, some argument a to boundaries.

10-1-70 Polls will be open at 9 a.m. in Woodhulls Store, Douglas, D.C. Putnam clerk

10-22-70 Douglas is an Incorporated Village order of incorporation dated Oct. 24, 1870

 

VILLAGE IMPROVMENTS

5-13-70 Douglas putting "Michigan Pavement" on Center St. ( sawdust)

5-30-71 Motion to build sidewalk on the w, side of the St. running s. from the church to the s.e. corner of C McDonalds lot --Common Council

7-29-71 A new sidewalk has been built along the east side of the block owned by T B Dutcher and Thomas Cray, anger is to be built along the north side of, Center st, between the School House and L. Upsons place.

10-17-77 It is time that line of stumps on the Wm Oliver Road was burned. If it is allowed to remain this winter the road will be impassable

10-17-77 We have orchard trimmings that have lain in our streets all summer that are a nuisance. Marshal do your duty.

4-5-78 4 roads leaving Douglas to the south, not one fit to travel in wet weather 7-26-78 A. Ash digging an extensive ditch on Center street

7-18-79 The plank and timber are on the ground for a side walk from Hutchinson Bro and Co s' dock in Douglas up into town.

7-30-80 Commissioner Spencer is doing a nice job of road work in Douglas. He is making a grade from the corner at H. Takken's place down past the Woodhull building. An open ditch has been opened along the south side down to Woodhull corner, and from there down to the corner of J. Collins place a blind ditch of either stone or wood will be put in.

6-3-8l -See Common Council May 31st 1881[improvements, sidewalks locations, and business men]

10-20-82 A large cistern of some 300 barrels capacity is being built on the corner apposite D. C. Putnams.

7-29-81 Center street is being opened through to the lake, and will make, when finished, one of the most beautiful drives in this locality.

 

SCHOOLS

 

2-11-71 Several petitions to the Legislature are circulating in this village,among which are those applying for state uniformity for textbooks in common schools, unchangeable for 6 years, and another for compelling children of certain ages to attend school a certain amount of time, and making it unlawful to expel children of these ages from school unless they be sent to the House of Correction

8-12-71 104 pupils enrolled at Doug Union Sc.., 4 teachers.

 

 

CIVIC INSTITUTIONS AND ORGANIZATIONS

 

4-15-71 Douglas intends to buy $60 worth of books to start a school library

11-18-81 The Douglas people are organizing a library club to provide reading for the winter. They have already quite a list of names. The membership fee is five dollars and the books after being read by the members will be let or sold at reasonable prices.

 

GOVERNMENTAL

 

5-20-71 Marshal C. W. Goshorn appt'd Dr. W. F. Wiley, deputy Marshal

 

ODDS OF DOUGLAS

 

5-20-71 A Douglas youth, impounded a cow, for the reward, the owner of the cow pounded the boy for revenge, and Justice Firman let the man off, for $5

2-21-79 DOUGLAS PEOPLE IN FREMONT MICHIGAN --Sheridan Tannery ; owned and conducted by D. Gerber and Sons, main bldg 166 x 36 ft, additions a leach room 150 x 33 ft ; boiler house 50x 30 ft., four boilers and an engine of 80 h.p, furnish their motive power. Tan annually 36,500 sides of leather, which must be watched by Andrew Gerber, Will Gerber middle man. There is a grocery on the site of the Tannery. communication in the tannery is by use of speaking tubes. Many men went with them to Fremont from Douglas i.e Harry Gaze, Jas Wilcox, Louis Zarndt and Jas Holmes. Freemont Union School, bldg of white brick stands on an elevation overlooking entire town . Prof Warnok, principal in Douglas for 3 years 190 enrolled. G. N Wade - Brickmaking, just south of village, the school house, the residence of J. Gerber and two brick blocks in the village are built with bricks from his yard.

1-4-78 DOUGLAS' NAME -- Douglas, Mi, Jan 1st 1878

Noticing in your issue of Dec 28 an article in "Douglas" .I find you are puzzled as to the origin of its name. Being conversant with the christening of said Village I would like to say that the Village of Douglas was platted by my Grandfather, Wm. F. Dutcher and named after Douglas, capitol of the isle of Man and birthplace of my father Frederick H. May, now of Allegan, in fact, my father named the place. The general impression that the name was after Sen. Stephen A. Douglass is wrong, and a glance at the manner of spelling the two names will at once show Their is no foundation for the later supposition.- Yours Truly Wm. A. May

 

FIRES

5-27-71 The roof of the Meeting House near Thomas Gray and Co. Mill, was found to be on fire near the chimney last Mon. The fire was put out before any damage was done.

10.17-77 On Wed fast the dwelling house of Geo. Billings was destroyed by fire about 11 o'clock a.m. The wind was blowing a perfect gale and the family barely escaped with their lives. They saved neither furniture nor clothing. The house and contents were insured for $600. After the Billings House was burned, another alarm of fire was sounded. Sparks from Paynes' mill had caught under a blacksmith shop on Moores' Mill yard, but made but little headway owing to the dampness of the weather. No damage was done.

10-19-77 Geo Billings recv'd his insurance less $10 discount as interest for 60 days

9-29-82 Two Fires in Douglas . - Just after finishing the printing of our edition last Friday morning, we were startled by the continual blowing of whistles in Douglas, which at once told us there was a fire . By a spark from the smokestack the barn belonging to Wallin and Phillips tannery, had been set fire. All efforts to save the structure proved futile, and it, with the fine horse of Mr. Phillips became pert' to the devouring element. Mr. John Slighter sustained severe and painful burns on his hands, face, and shoulders in his endeavors to save the horse. From the effects of which he is still unable to work. The loss is put down at $500, as $300 would not have bought the horse.

Tuesday morning about 11 o'clock the alarm of fire was again sounded, and the skies were dark with vast volumes of black smoke mingled with streaks of lurid red flame. It was found to be the drying house connected with the tannery of Wallin and Phillips, and owing to the great headway it had gained before being discovered, it was entirely consumed, together with a trifle over 1,300 sides of leather . Fortunately the wind was easterly thus driving the heat and flames away from the tannery proper, which was the only thing that saved it, there being no fire apparatus in Douglas, and by the time the Saugatuck Fire Co arrived upon the grounds the dry house was in ruins, all that remained to be done was to deaden it near the part uninjured, and let the rest smolder . The loss is quite heavy being placed at $8,000; insurance light.

 

JAIL / CEMETERY

 

6-3-71 Jail to be built, shall be 12 x 16 on the ground, and 10 feet high--Common Council

10-19-77 Who has charge of the Douglas burying ground ? We notice it has been turned into a cow pasture. This is not as it should be. The last resting place of the dead should be held more sacred, beautified and ornamented, so as to inspire feelings of veneration, as if it was holy ground, and the portals of a more heavenly land beyond.

9-5-79 We notice that the jail in Douglas has been moved from its position down in the swamp to a pleasant locality at the foot of the hilt .

 

COMMON COUNCIL - BYLAWS -ORDINANCES

6-3-71 Mr. Wade gave petition to Board relative to changing by-laws of putting animals in pound --Common Council

5-30-71 Motion to build sidewalk on the w. side of the st, running s. from the church to the s.e. corner of C McDonalds lot --Common Council

5-30-71 Motion made to rescind the motion of 3/8 per cent and raise it to 5/8 on the dollar for tax. Carried.--Common Council

6-10-71 Our friends living in the country will be interested in two ordinances of the Village of Douglas. One is to the effect that any dog found at large, without being securely muzzled, shall be killed by the Marshal or his deputy. The other forbids leaving a team or horse unhitched in the streets under penalty of fine.

8-3-77 Resolution adopted by the Board of Trustees. Resolved. That we tender our sincere thanks to the Saugatuck Fire Co., for their timely aid in assisting to subdue the fire of July 17th. Resolved. That we present the Co. the sum of $10 as a small token of our appreciation of their noble spirit and manly conduct in coming to our rescue in our time of need.

10-17-77 A CARD ; To the Fireman of Saugatuck: In behalf of the Village of Douglas I tender my sincere thanks to the Fire and Hose Companies of the Village of Saugatuck for their prompt attendance at our fire an Wednesday last. We appreciate their noble spirit and feel as grateful as though they had saved our whole village D. McLean, Pres.

3-5-80 Village Elections : Pres D. W. Wiley; Trustees, S. C. Reed, Jonas Crouse, Joseph Collins; Assessor, D. W. Wiley; Treas, Jonas Crouse; Marshal, Henry Walbrecht; St Comm M. B. Spencer.

5-7-80 The Douglas people have been quite excited lately on the subject of boundary lines, and called upon the Co. Surveyor to settle the matter for them.

4-7-82 Dr Young Health Officer for one year at salary of $5

 

POSTAL SERVICE

 

6-10-71 D. C. Putnam, postmaster

8-12-81 The Douglas P.O. will be a money order office after next Monday.

 

ENTERTAINMENT

7-29-71 Douglas gave the Coronet band $43.25 to purchase new instruments., band recv'd of S A Morrison $5 in adds to amount before presented by him

3-29-78 Douglas has organized a baseball club. They are talking of erecting a stand on the Public Square for the accommodation of spectators. They play a practice game every Sat. and, as there will be no profane or vulgar language used on the ground, ladies are especially invited.

5-24-78 Douglas Baseball Club go to Holland tomorrow to play a match game with the Holland Club

5-31-78 W. A. Woolworth is fencing in the Baseball grounds at the Douglas club. Mr Woolworth is agent for Keith Bros. who own the ground.

8-2-78 Douglas is to have a brass band. Nearly money enough has been raised to pay for the instruments.

4-15-81 The Douglas Band stand "tuk" another move this week. The boys are prospecting from what corner of the square they can get the best view.

7-16-70 The ladies of the M. E. Church will give an Ice Cream Festival next Tuesday evening in the home lately occupied by Dudley Wade [Douglas]

5-21-80 Octagon House Douglas; "The Golden Shore" douglas singers

 

FRUIT GROWERS

We have orchard trimmings that have lain in our streets all summer that are a nuisance. Marshal do your duty.

 

PERSONALS

3-1-78 Mark Gray, a brother of Mr Gray of this village, is on a visit and viewing our fruit lands with a view of investing.

5-17-78Bird Firman returned from the horse sale at Holland last week with a span of horses that he pronounces "A-1", They are a fine looking team, price $200. Pete Lackey also brought back a heavy pair of Draught horses for the mill work around Crouse and Grays' Mill

 

RAILROADS

1-23-80 The Douglas folks have subscribed $10,000 toward the building of a plug road from Fennville to Douglas . The R.12. agree to build it to that point if 512,000 be subscribed. It is now Saugatucks time to put in. We want a R. R. too.

 

RIVER

 

2-25-81 The river has been up to the edge of the Douglas docks the past week, but has now fallen some

 

TELEGRAPH -TELEPHONE

 

4-22-81 Telegraph. -- The Douglas folks are running telegraph wires all around that enterprising burg. The headquarters are at Moores' Office and Charlie Moore is head operator. From there, it radiates to the Grist Mill, J. C. Hutchinsons store, Bird and Cos., and Putnams store.

5-20-81 Telegraphic and Telephonic communications is now held between all the principal business places in Douglas. Moores' office is head center, and Charlie Moore head operator.

6-3-81 The click of the telegraph instrument is now heard in every business place in Douglas, and a marine line will soon connect the sister villages.

8-26-81 Telegraph.-- Saugatuck and Douglas should be connected by telegraph or telephone . If some enterprising citizen of either village would start the ball rolling

 

BUSINESS DIRECTORY

DR. ANDREWS

2-13-80 Fracus- Agricola of Douglas says that the Commercial knows whose tongue incited the notorious slapping affray in Douglas . We do ; it was Dr Andrews . In the bar-room of the Eagle Hotel ha made slanderous mention of a ladies name, and Dr MacLean chastized him for the cowardly attack by slapping his face. Dr Andrews had a perfect right to woo and win Miss Daniels if he could, and as to property qualifications, we think there was not much to choose between them Miss Daniels is a lady whom we have never heard an evil whisper against, and we really cannot see how the daughty Doctor s' name could have been so injured by being mentioned in connection with hers, as he claims it has been, and from which to remove the foul blot he uses a column of the valuable space of the Journal.

2-20-80 Dr Andrews.-- We suppose it is now in order for the duly snuffed out. "Agricola" alias 'C. A.', of Douglas, has dubbed them the " heathens dwelling in darkness" and avers that they are addicted to "painted glass and printed prayers". It is the doctors ambition that his cranium should as closely resemble one of Bob Ingersols' skulls as possible, and he is ready at any time to run amuk against any religious denomination whatsoever.

 

1st reference on 1-11-7 812-10-80-12-24-80

BALDWIN AND FINN -- DENTISTS - Douglas

1-18-78 Messrs. Baldwin and Finn are located in Douglas for the purpose of practicing dentistry in all its branches. A large practice extending over many years gives them a confidence that they are competent to perform any operation in Cheer line of business to the entire satisfaction of all Cheer patrons. Much complaint is often heard of filling in teeth coming out. The Drs make this part of dentistry a specialty and can guarantee entire satisfaction in this as in all other branches of Cheer profession. As to pay, they want all the money they can get, of course, but don't stay away, because you have no money as they will take anything you have to spare of which they can make any use, horses, oxen, or cows, and so on, down to grain, produce, or even poultry . Prices reasonable. A full upper set of teeth for from 20 to 245 according to quality of teeth, and all other work in proportion. Office at the house of John Kirby near the Old Gerber Tannery

4-12-78 Dr S. A. Baldwin has moved to the place he purchased of Mr Hamilton, where he is prepared to do all kinds of work in the dentistry line.

6-7-78 Dr S. A. Baldwin is now prepared to do all kinds of work in the dentistry line at his residence on the old Hamilton place in first class style and at the lowest prices. All kinds of produce taken in exchange for work.

4-16-80 Dr S. A. Baldwin has returned from his visit to Dowagiac, Mi, improved in health, and would be glad to see his old patrons at his residence north of town.

12-10-80 - 6-17-81 Blk Adv: Dr S. A. Baldwin, Dentist. Has opened an office for the practice of dentistry in all of its branches, over Chas E. Bird's Drug Store, in the rooms with Dr Young . Office hours, from 9 a. m. to 4 p, m. have not space to mention. and are warranted. lie intends to keep everything |n his line as low as any other dealer in this section. 10-1-70 D.Gerber has bought the property of ?B. Buck,who goes to Kansas.

4-22-71 Stephen D Nichols lately started a meat market in the store formerly occupied by L. D. Buck, and later by C. McDonald and Co., as a Furniture Store -- Douglas 5-6-71 New Ad -- Washngton Meat Market - S.D.Nichols corner of Hoffman and Butler Saug. Corner of

Fremont and Water- Douglas

2-22-78 Mr. Gerber is repairing the Book building .We understand it is to be occupied as a store next season

 

10-28-71 1st ref.

BUSH, HILL, AND JOHNSON

10-25-71 Bush, Hill,and Johnson are located at the south end of the Lake St. bridge where they have put up a temporary building

 

7-16-88 -l l-20-69

THOMAS COLLIER DRUG STORE -- Center St. Douglas

8-13-68 The new Drug Store! Thomas Collier, Douglas, Mich. Has opened a new first class drug store. A full assortment of Drugs, Medicines, Pure Wines and Liquors for medical purposes. Also Paints, Oils, Varnishes and Putty. Also a complete assortment of Perfumeries, Toilet Soaps, Tooth and Nail Brushes. Long experience in the prescription business enables um to fill the orders of Physicians correctly and with dispatch. We also warrant our goods, and guarantee to sell at the lowest Chicago prices. But I think 'To sell for cash is the best for me, as well as all the rest.' Thomas Collier

7-30-68Go to Collier's Soda Fountain in Douglas to quench your thirst 'Thomas Collier offers to sell village lots at low figures and liberal terms, in Douglas, Mi. Those desirous of becoming permanent, will do well to purchase, as the town is growing and the property advancing.'

4-3-69 Mr. Collier !o also getting the timber and material together for the erection of a building for his Drug Store upon the land lately purchased by him on the corner of Center and Washington Sts 5-0-69 Mr. Thomas Collier, Druggist, has his new store building almost completed

 

6-25-70 1st reference -9-2-71 Ensign Drugs 12-2-71'

COLLIER & ENSIGN --Saugatuck, corner Butler and Mason sts - Douglas

C. A. ENSIGN DRUGS -- 8-9-91 - 12-2-71

7-70 We are glad 1o see Mr. Ensign has returned. ( to Douglas) He will give his attention to the Douglas store, where our readers will find him happy to supply their needs

3-10-71 C.A.Ensign has hung out a sign "Cash Paid for Grain" at his drug store.

3-25-71 Douglas - During the week C. A. Ensign has paid about $300,cash for grain at the drug store in Douglas,Consider the state of the roads and say if khakis not a pretty fair weeks work.

4-8-71 Drugs, Medicines, Paints, Oils, Glass. Varnishes, Perfumery, Toilet Goods, Soaps, Dye Stuffs, Fruit Jars, Lamps, Books, Stationary, Wallpaper. A complete stock of toys, and Notions. In short everything usually kept du a 1st class retail drug store can be found by calling upon Collier and Ensign at their stores in Saugatuck and Douglas.

8-5-71 Collier and Ensign sold their Drug Store in Douglas to Dr. A.C.Goodrich & Dr. McLean, who will undoubtedly gain a good run of customers at once, as they are not the penny wise and pound foolish class who fear to invest a dollar or two in printers ink,that most potent of all means for incurring business. See their advertisement in the next paper

Died -- Wed. Aug. 9th 71 Thomas Collier

8-26-7l CA Ensign to control business done on this store (Saug side)

11-4-71 Dissolution Notice, The co-partnership heretofore existing between Thomas Collier and Caleb A. Ensign, under the style of Collier and Ensign, is dissolved by the death of the senior partner. The undersigned will continue the Drug Business at the Saugatuck Drug Store. Sept. 30th 1871 C. A. Ensign Notice .The accounts of the firm Collier and Ensign will be settled by the remaining partner. C. A. Ensign Samuel Johnson Administrator of the Estate of Thomas Collier dec'd

 

6-8-77 1st reference

THE WEEKLY NEWS -DOUGLAS

6-8-77 The "Weekly News",C. M. Winslow,Editor; Douglas, MI, June 7th 1877" greeted the public with a pleasant smile on Thursday

6-29-77 Readers of the Douglas Weekly paper,you need not believe what that paper says about the Bankrupt Clothing Store, ms you can convince yourselves by calling at the store and examining the goods as they are new and fresh, and not overhauled goods. The reason the editor of the Douglas paper wrote this was because he could not get any job work from me as he charges double what it is worth. Proprietor of the Bankrupt Store

7-13-77 I have this day sold my interest in the Weekly News to Byron Markham who has united it with the Commercial, as I am about to leave Saugatuck to accept a position elsewhere My accounts are in the hands of R . L Newnham, who is authorized to close them up. C.M.Winslow Saug 7-20-77

 

3-3-02 1st ref.

DR E. CULVER

3-3-82 Dr E. Culver has located in Douglas, He will occupy the Ed Takken house as a residence, but has not yet secured an office.

3-10-82 Dr E. Culvers family arrived from Ontario this week

 

12-l4-77

J. N.DANIELS --SHOES OR BOOTS

12-14-77 -If you'll leave the size of your feet with Daniels, he will fit you up with a first class boot 12-5-79 J N Daniels has reopened his shoe shop in the old Douglas Store building in Douglas where he is ready to do all kinds of shoemakers work on short notice.

 

7-16-68 to 20-28-71

DOUGLAS HOUSE -

(7-16-68 to 11-13-69 W,D.ROBERTS,PROP,R.)

(11-13-69 -7-9-70 -C.G.Maxson,Prop'r.)

( 7-9-70~ 10-1-70 Weatherwax & Maxson Prop'rs.)

(10-1-70 John Ryan, Prop'r)

0~6-l868 Daniel Kelly has bought out the saloon in the Douglas House and will keep a good stock of Liquors, Groceries, and segars. A billiard table is also connected with the same.

10-17-68 W. P. Roberts repainting Douglas House and other improvements

11-21-68 Roberts has made an addition to the Douglas House

11-28-89 Changed Hands. -- The Hotel in Douglas has been purchased by a gentlemen by the name of Maxson, who has given the house a thorough renovating and repairing, making it a neat and commodious place to stop.

7-9-70 Weatherwax and Maxson Prop'rs

9-l0-70 Weatherwax and Maxson want to rent the Douglas House to some good man

10-1-78 Weatherwax and Maxson have sold the Douglas House to John Ryan 7-27-77 - 7-26-78 CLASSIFIEDS

DOUGLAS HOUSE -KIBBY PROP,R

7-27-77 Mine host of the Eagle House, Douglas, is still alive and ready to attend to the wants of the traveling public. This House is the most pleasantly situated of any we know of, and the guests are made at home as soon as they arrive. Kibby was made for a landlord and it is lucky for the people who stop with him that he has a wife that is indeed a helpmate.

11-1-78 We understand Messrs Newton and Walker are fitting up the Hall of the Eagle House in view of having dramatic entertainments through the winter

3-28-79 Kibby has a new oak floor in his billiards room. Thomas Gray intends reflooring his store with the same material. The Hotel formerly known as the"Eagle House" is to wear the cognomen "Douglas House". The popular proprietor, J. H. Kibby, intends that it shall be under the new name what it has been under the old one, one of the best hostelries on the Lakeshore"

9-26-79 The Douglas Hotel property was bid on by Mr Maxson at the sale at Allegan last Monday

3-5-80 J. H. Kibby has bargained for the Douglas House at $900. He will fix it up in first class style "Kib' and wife have by good management and hard work,made out of a run down tenantless house a 1st class hotel for this country,for which they deserve great credit.

6-5-80 J. H. Kibbys new sign "Douglas House", which serves as a guide to that pleasant hostelry, does credit to the painter C. W. Newton.

1-7-8l J. Kibby of the Douglas House is fitting up the dancing hall of his hotel, into sleeping rooms. They are

to be arranged in suits so that next season he will be prepared to board families.

4~22~81 J. Kibby, prop,r* of the D. H. is fitting up a part of the dancing hail into a sample room and it is going to make an elegant one,well lighted and convienlent in every way.

1-20-82 Kibby has put a new pool table in the basement of the Douglas House

4-7-82 The Douglas House is being repainted inside and out. Three rooms have been added, one of which will be used for a sample room.

2-16-83 A circular requesting the hotel keeper of Douglas to comply with the law in regard to minors, is receiving many signatures, including the most influential citizens of the village. 2-23-83 For Sale ! The Douglas House and the premises, or will rent the basement .J.H. Kibby

6-l6-77 -(5-7-77 R. REID--11-1-78

DOUGLAS BASKET FACTORY ---JOHN S. PAYNE PROP,R

In Full Blast We now inform the people that the Douglas Basket Factory is in complete running order,and that we are prepared to supply Fruit packages on the shortest notice and at rates defying the competition. In addition we have machinery in operation for planing, matching, sticking, molding, turning and all fancy wood work and competition rates. Special rates to builders .All work warranted. John S. Payne and Co^ May 17 1877

7-27-77 A portion of the Douglas Basket factory machinery was sold on Tues last under chattle mortgage sale for S649. Captain Robert Ried being the lucky man

8-3-77 The Basket Factory has changed hands, Payne selling out and Captain Ried buying in. The firm will be now Ried and Co., extended report of this institution in our next issue.

5-7-77 1ST RIED BLOCK ADV.

10-19-77 The Douglas Basket Factory has made 125, 875 peach baskets, 1,000 peach boxes, 800 grape boxes and 3,000 berrie crates this season, all of which have been sold. This factory has made the neatest and best package that has been put on the market this season. We make no exceptions. Next season we expect they will sell no less than 300,000 in their home markete

3-1-78 Block adv. ~~~ Horrible Crash! A. W. Walker and Bro. are prepared to do all kinds of carpenter and joiner work in all its branches at panic prices. We mean business. Give us a call. at the Douglas Basket Factory.

5-3-78 A new planer arrived at the Douglas Basket Factory Tues morning by the Heath.

5-24-78 Reed and Weed are making an extension to thier basket factory.

6-28-78 ADV. -~ In Full Blast. We now inform the people that the Douglas Basket Factory is in complete running order, and that we are prepared to supply Fruit Packages on the shortest notice and at rates defying competition. We have just put in a new plainer and matching machine, and are ready to do work of this kind on short notice and cheaper than ever before. Prices for plaining even lumber, $1.50 per thousand. Sticking moulding, turning, and all fancy work at comptetative rates. Special rates to builders. All work warranted Robert Ried. May 7, 1878

7~5~78 "This institution has been enlarged this season and new machinery purchased. Everything about the premises has been put in first class order, and now Ried and Co. are in condition to do first class work. They commenced making baskets three weeks ago, but are running only a small crew at present. They turn out about 2,000 baskets a day, but will double in a short time, so as to be able to meet all demands. Shippers can rely on getting good packages and plenty of them. No fears need be entertained but what they will have on hand all the market demands. They expect to manufacture 200,000 baskets this season, one half of which are already contracted for ...."

9-20-78 Capt R. Reid has shut down his basket works for the season. The planing mill is still in operation

9-12-79 The Douglas Basket Factory is running to its fullest capacity and yet cannot supply the demand for baskets. They employ 15 men and 20 girls.

9~19~79 Accident. ~ Sunday morning Fernando Smith, while running the veneering machine at the basket factory had one finger broken and the end of another cut off.

11-7-79 Wm Weed has bought the lots belonging to T. Hauer and will build on them at once.

7-30-80 The Douglas Basket factory is "booming" and employs a score or two of girls besides the men it gives employment to.

9-l0-80 Weed and Co. Basket Factory ~we visited the basket factory of Messrs Weed &Co.,in Douglas last Monday they are turning out baskets at a rate of 3,000 per day the material used is soft maple and elm which the complicated machinery in use throughout the factory rapidly cuts into diverse shapes and sizes adapted to the construction of these baskets. The logs are first cut by a drag saw to the required length, about six feet,when after having the bark peeled from them,they are placed in a large steam box, and thoroughly softened by steam directly from the engine. From thence the log is removed by means of a large crane, to a lathe, where it is raised and grasped at each end by the lathe 'centers' which hold it firmly in position as it revolves. At every turn a knife gauged to the required thickness pares off the inequalities of the log until the unevenness disappears, when the perfect timber comes from the knife in a continuous sheet and is passed to the cutting table near at hand,and sawed to the various sizes required,and taken to the upper part of the factory where the literal basket making is done .This is the most interesting part of the factory to the observer ; the work is done almost exclusively by women and girls ~ the crates which hold four baskets each,are also made by girls,of stuff sawed to sizes especially adapted to their manufacture. Messrs Weed and Co give employment to 35 hands and pay them each week $203.15. The factory is run at a total expense of $450.00 per week,and produces 3,000 baskets and 750 crates daily, great as this amount is, it is not equal to the demand of the fruit growers of Douglas and vicinity,and the propr's of the factory have been obliged to run night and day.

6-3-81 G. T. Arnold and R. C. Brittain have sold Weed and Co., a site for their basket factory on the Dutcher mill lots.

7-22-81 Weed and Co.'s basket factory has shut down for a short time . They have 70,000 baskets on hand.

7-29-8l The Dutcher mill is being torn down by Weed and Co., to make room for their basket factory.

8-12-81 Notice .To our customers .We are still on hand with peach baskets, which we now offer for $3.50 per hundred with covers. We do not propose to be undersold -Wm. Weed and Co.

9-9-81 John Craig had one of his fingers taken off at the basket factory last Tuesday,and had his hand badly mangled.

10-21-81 R. Williams portable saw-mill was sold this week on a chattel mortgage, and was bought by parties in Ohio. Messrs J. E. Durham and Frank Shrively have rented it to run the balance of the season, to cut John Paynes and Wm Weeds logs

12-30-81 Weed and Co are busy fitting up the old Dutcher mill for a basket manufactory, and will have it ready to run in time for their spring work.

1-27-82 R. C. Brittain next spring will build a large and commodious fruit warehouse, just above the bridge,adjoining Weed Bros basket factory.

10-6-82 So great is the demand for fruit packages that growers are standing around the factory and snatch their baskets the moment they are done .More help wanted there, sure.

10-27-82 Mr William Weed has bought the old Dutcher Mill boarding house property of J. S. Payne.

11-24-82 Wm. Weed & Co,, of the Douglas Basket Factory, made some 140,000 peach baskets, 6,000 peach boxes, and over 5,000 berry crates this season, and had there been greater help more could have been turned out . Look out for them next season.

 

9-2-81 1st reference

DOUGLAS UNION TELEGRAPH LINE

`9-2-81 Telegraph. -- The distance between Saugatuck and Douglas has been measured by the Douglas Union Telegraph Line, and the distance found to be 6,675 feet . The Douglas people are desirous of uniting the two villages by telegraph, and we hope to see our citizens heartily cooperate with them.

 

l-16-69

DUTCHER & MOORE (WAREHOUSE ) Douglas, ~ 1st ref.

probably owners of the "OLD DUTCHER WAREHOUSE", and properties at the south landing of the proposed new bridge

 

7-27-77

DOUGLAS WAREHOUSE- or-PAYNES WAREHOUSE

7~27~77 One of the busiest and best regulated institutions of Douglas, is Paynes Warehouse, conducted by Hutchinson Bro and Co. It is a large and commodious structure, consisting of a main building 32x 40 feet, 3 stories high, and an addition of 40x 40 feet, which is the general receiving and delivery department. A further addition of 2ox30 feet is to be made before the peach season opens, so that two steamboats can be alongside the dock and discharge and receive freight at the same time, without interfering with each other. This will have a projecting roof so that the fruit may be unloaded in rainy weather without getting wet. The first floor of the main building is used for storing wool, of which the firm have bought this season about 12,000 lbs, at prices ranging from 32 to 40 cts, amounting to $4,500 Mr Payne,the senior member of the firm, has been engaged in this for several years and is steadily increasing from year to year, owing to his just and upright conduct in dealing fairly with the parties engaged in wool growing. The second and third floors are used for storing apple barrels, and pork barrels, crates, berry boxes, peach and grape boxes and covers. They will manufacture this season about 100,000 baskets and covers and 2,000 apple barrels, making it a great convenience to shippers and fruity growers, to get their fruit packages without loss of time,when they have unloaded their fruit. Fruit this year will be docked at their warehouse for l/4 ct per crate or basket, formerly it was as high as one cent. Baskets will be sold by the 1000 far $30.00, which is less than they have been sold for before. They also keep for sale, Salt, Lime, and Stucco. The fruit department is under the supervision of J. E. Hutchinson

3-28-79 Mr Finley, the millwright in the employ of J. S. Payne has bought the 'Stedman Place' and intends fitting it up as a residence for himself.

11-18-81 The `J. S. Seaverns took from the Douglas warehouse last Tuesday, 507 barrels of sundries and 32 sacks of clover seed.

2-17-82 The following amounts were shipped from the Douglas warehouse for the season of 1881, per steamers, J. S. Seaverns, O.C. Williams, and Alice Purdy: 42,938 baskets fruit, 2,931 barrels apples, 3,991 barrels flour, 1,000 bushels clover seed, 500 bushels potatoes, 300 bushels onoins, five ton rags, 3,800 1bs scrap iron

 

6-22-77

DOUGLAS TANNERY

6-22-77 C. C. Wallin and Sons have purchased the Douglas Tannery of D. Gerber & Son. They do not take possession until the -first of October

9-29-82 A spark arrestor will henceforth grace the stack of the Douglas tannery.

 

4-28-71 - 12-2-71

classifieds

J. DOWD -- House and Sign Painter, Douglas

 

10-7-81 1st ref

EVERET DURHAM - LIVERY

10-7-51 H. Bird has sold his horses and all his rigs to Everet Durham, who will keep them to let. Everet proposes to supply all that want good horses at reasonable rates. Apply at the Hotel. ~.

10-21-81 R. Williams portable saw-mill was sold this week on a chattel mortgage, and was bought by parties in Ohio. Messrs J. E. Durham and Frank Shrively have rented it to run the balance of the season, to cut John Paynes and Wm Weeds logs

 

4-28-71 1st reference ~ 10-7-71

C. A. ENSIGN -- SURVEYOR, office Douglas at Collier and Ensigns

 

8-31-77 1st ref 4-9-80

LUDWIG EWALD TAILOR --- DOUGLAS

5-31-77 Tailor Shop, Douglas Mi., Ludwig Ewald Would announce to the citizens of Douglas, Saugatuck and vicinity, that he is prepared to do all kinds of work in his line, in a workman like manner and Guarantee satisfaction . Special attention given to Cleaning and repairing.

2-8-78 Ewald has hired a seamstress.

12-3-80 Carl Ebmeyer has opened a tailor shop in the Nichols building . He has worked for the last year with L. Ewald in Douglas. He will do all kinds of repairing and cleaning of mens and boys clothing at reasonable rates.

2-3-82 Died in Douglas, Jan 28th, the wife of Ludwig Ewald . Mrs Ewald was born in Hanover, Germany in 1843, and came to Douglas with her husband in 1873 . During the past 10years they have lost five beautiful children, ranging in age from sixteen months to seven years, who are buried beside their mother in the Douglas cemetery.. She leaves a husband and four children, the youngest a babe of nine months.

6-23-82 Ewald the tailor has his hands more than full.

3-2-83 Byline adv. --Ewald L ., of Douglas . Merchant Tailor. Cut to latest patterns . Guarantees a perfect fit. Clothes cleaned and repaired.

 

7-70 1st reference

FIRMANS' --Douglas

Any one wanting musical instruments will do well to call at Firmans' in Douglas, and look at those for sale by Mr. Dodge. Prices will suit purchasers

 

N. C. FIRMAN - DOUGLAS

6-6-79 Sheep Shearing -- I will shear this years clip at 9 cts per head, and board. I am not a fast shearer, but do my work well. Enquire at Grays' Store, Douglas. N. C. Firman, Jr.

 

2-13-80 1st reference

NATE FIRMAN

2-13-80 Date Firman can be found at his Barber Shop every day from this time forth, especially Sundays.

4-9-80 A. H. Ehle is having his house repainted and its looks does credit to those artisit's of the brush C. W. Newton and N. Firman.

 

7-30-70 1st reference -- 10-15-70 (9-9-71 to-2-71 notary corner Water and Fremont)

J. GERBER & CO. -- General Goods, Douglas'.

7-30-70 Gerber and Co are selling the best of goods, look at their advertisement and see for yourself. 7-30-70 We wish to call attention to our constantly replenished and always complete stock of Mens and Boys clothing Hats, caps, boots, shoes, ladies boots, gaiters, slippers, hose, dress goods, muslins, sheetings, woolen clothes, glassware, crockery, wooden ware, teas coffees, spices,. sugars, and syrups, flour and feed, vegetables and fruit, both fresh and dried, salt meats and provisions of all kinds. The best qualities of tobbacco always on hand.

8-6-70 Best white wheat flour $8.50 bl at Gerbers', Douglas

9-3-70 J. Gerber and Co. have sold their store to Dyer C. Putnam.

10-1-70 D. Gerber has bought the property of L. D. Buck, who goes to Kansas.

12-23-71Mrs Williams has opened a new store in the building formerly occupied by J Gerber and Co

9-23-81 We learn that Mr and Mrs J. Gerber of Fremont, formerly of Douglas, lost thier oldest son this week . He died of diptheria and the two remaining children are dangerously ill with the same disease.

 

11-21-68

GERBER AND SON TANNERY-- Douglas

11-21-68 Gerber and Son have built in Douglas a large four story building for the purpose of drying their leather, which they manufacture at the rate of 400 sides a week.

6-11-70 Gerber is enlarging his tannery to make room for his rapidly increasing business

8-6-70 Gerber is building an addition to his tannery

10-3-79 F. B. Wallin has one of the unhairing machines patented by Gerber and Sons of Fremont, put into his Saugatuck Tannery.

CLASSIFIEDS 5-20-71 to 12-2-71

D. GERBER AND SON -- Manufacturer of Leather, Dealer in Hides, Tallow

1-1 6-80 D. Gerber has bought the right of several counties in this state and a large territory in Indiana to sell Newkirks Improved, Stock Food Steamer, This steamer is highly recommended

 

8-5-71 1st reference 12-2-71

GOODRICH - MCLEAN DRUG STORE ---Douglas

5-27-71 Dr. A.C. Goodrich has bought the unfinished house owned by Wm. Woodhull on Center St., and is hauling lumber for finishing it. We understand that the doctor has concluded to practice in Douglas and vicinity.

8-5-71 -- Collier and Ensign sold their Drug Store in Douglas to Dr. A. C. Goodrich & Dr. McLean, who will undoubtedly gain a good run of customers at once, as they are not the penny wise and pound foolish class who fear to invest a dollar or two in printers ink,that most potent of all means for incurring business. See their advertisement in the next paper

 

2-15-78 1st reference

H. E.GRAHAM -CARPENTER - DOUGLAS

2-15-78 H. E.Graham, of Douglas, one of the best carpenters and house builders in this vicinity, would like to buy a good horse, and pay for the same in his work. We can vouch for his reliability : whatever he promises can be relied on.

 

1-7-08 reference--3-30-83

MARTIN GRAY -CLOCK REPAIR

1-7-81 ....Hurt from fall off wagon 2 years ago,confined to bed most of the time since, began repairing clocks for free, now has more work than he can handle and is begun charging.

10-21-81 The Douglas boys have made uncle Martin Gray a present of a nice little lathe and scroll saw combined ;also a vice and anvil .Now bring along your little jobs and he will do the work for you cheap.

12-2-81 Large Adv. Look, read, and run, as you read and bring your clocks and watches to the Boss Tinker of Douglas for repairs,and if you have a sewing machine that Will Dickey can't repair bring it to me- but see him first. I can get new or make any part of any clock or watch ever made, and have prices of all clocks and watches, so I can sell you any one of them at factory prices. Any snid watch that is peddled off at $10 to $15 will cost you about $3.50 to $4.00-and is worth only about ten cents,but you can have it if you want it, or clock either .You can have a good one of either one at cost price. I ask nothing only that I get what repairing I can do, and will do it at the lowest possible price. Am at present located in Douglas and expect to continue to be, as no person in my crippled condition, could, if he were mean enough, set himself up for a traveling tramp of a Clock tinker. I am located on Main St.- east, leading to Grand Junction,or elsewhere,and two blocks from the mammoth store of J.E. Hutchinson & Co., where if any time you will trade $75 to $100 they will cheerfully show you around to my place . M. Gray, Douglas, Mi.

2-l7-82 Martin Gary - Douglas Jeweler

3-31~02 Uncle Mart. Gray is going to move into the rooms occupied by Mrs Kirby . That will make it better and handier for him and his customers.

4~21-82 Blk Ads'. MARTIN GRAY,of Douglas .We do all kinds of Watch and Clock repairing . Watch repairing a specialty.

11-24-02 Blk ADv- small

 

4-28-71 1st ref. -12-2-71

THOMAS GRAY AND CO. ---Manufacturer of Lumber, Lath, Shingles

7-70 1st reference

GRAYS STORE - Douglas

About l1 p.m. Saturday last Dyer Putnam discovered a bright flame in Grays, Storm, at the foot of the stairs leading to the rooms used as a dwelling by Mr. Grey. An alarm given the fire was soon put out. A moment or two more and Mr. Grays family would have been cut off from the ground floor and the result might have been very serious.

8-6-70 Chicago Ginger snaps a Grays

l-21-71 Gray does not advertise,but he does keep a good stock of goods on hand for sale

8-12-71.... Thomas Gray, prop'r of the largest store in Douglas, $40,000 per annum business. Store is 80' x 80', three stories high, building cost $ 3000

3-29-70Thomas Gray of Douglas has now and will keep on hand a supply of Oliver Chilled Plows, which will be sold at Manufacturers prices

8-2-78- Mr Thomas Gray is spoken of by the republicans of this district for senatorial honors----he has held the office of Twsp Supervisor for the past 6 years

3-20-79 Kibby has a new oak floor in his billiards room . Thomas Gray intends reflooring his store with the same material

11-21-79 Thomas Gray has a large stock of steel barbed fence wire for sale that is a great improvement on the old style.

4-l6-08T.C.Gray has bought the STORE and stock of goods formerly owned by Thos Gray and has added to it a full line of general Merchandise. He has secured the services of Henry Walbrecht, a salesmen favorably known to the country trade, and does not mean to be outdone by his brother merchants of Saugatuck and Douglas in either price or quality of goods.

6-11-80 T. C. Gray is adding materially to the looks of the Corner Store by the application of a fresh coat of paint.

4-16-80 1st reference)-7-81 4-29-81 -- 6-17-81

THOMAS (COLLINS) GRAY JR

7-25-79 Thom Gray Jr., has been appointed agent at Douglas for the American Express Co.

8-1-79 T. C. Gray (Tom Collins), agent for the American Express Co., will be found at the Saugatuck and Douglas warehouses ready to attend to all express business for the boats.

4-16-80 T. C. Gray has bought the STORE and stock of goods formerly owned by Thos Gray and has added to it a full line of general Merchandise. He has secured the services of Henry Walbrecht, a salesmen favorably known to the country trade, and does not mean to be outdone by his brither merchants of Saugatuck and Douglas in either price or quality of goods.

5-7-80 T. C. Gray has repainted and remodeled the "Old Store on the Corner", until it is hardly recognizable. Thomas Jr, is showing a commendable spirit of enterprise.

7-30-80 The Douglas Band are building a Bandstand on the Public Square opposite Tom Collies Store. 1-7-81 Try the new firm at Tom Collies old stand . They will sell you goads cheap; if you don't believe it call and see,

1-7-81 It is reported that T. C. Gray will again engage in business in Douglas. Tom has built himself up a first class reputation as a fair dealer during his year in business, and we hope Western Allegan will not lose him yet awhile.

1-7-81 To Whom It May Concern: -I take this method of informing all my old friends and customers that I have connected myself with the firm J. A. Hutchinson and Co., at the old stand of Thos. Gray, they having bought out the "Great Bonanza Merchant" Tom Collies. the stock on hand was bought for cash at prices that I know are way down, some of which you will find noticed in another column. I will try my best to please you at least it will do you no harm to call and examine the stock and price. J. W. Dickey

1-7-81 T. C. Gray has sold out his store to J. A. Hutchinson and, Co. The new firm is one well known to our readers as the old firm Hutchinson Bros and Co., of the Douglas Flouring Mills. Jesse Hutchinson and John Payee are the owners of the Merchandise Bonanza, and both well known as men of enterprise and sagacity in business matters . They have a large capital to invest, and intend keeping a stock of goods, not to be excelled in this county. J. W. Dickey, one of the best known salesmen in this region will have the management of that department, which alone ensures good sales.

4-29-81 T. C. Gray is again in business in Douglas . See his advertisement.

5-20-81 Tom Collins is putting up a machinery hall north of J. E. Hutchinsons' store . He will keep all kinds of agricultural implements.

5-27-81 Tom Collins has the frame of his new building up and enclosed. It is 30x36 feet.

7-15-81 Tom Collins can be found at his agricultural hall, in Douglas, Mondays and Saturdays.

 

11-21-68

HALL AND UPSON WAGON MAKERS ---Douglas

l1-21-68 Hall & Upson have erected a two story wagon shop, where they calculate to manufacture anything and everything in their line that may be called for.

12-2-81 Dr Baldwin has rented the rooms over Bird and Cos., drug store,for dentistry . His residence will be in the Upson Building across form D. C. Putnams store.

 

7-26-781st reference

FRANK HIGGINS --- EXPRESS AGENT-Douglas

7-26-78 Our genial townsmen, Frank Higgins, has completed arrangements with the American Express Co., and is now in a position to do business for that company. In a few days he will conclude arrangements with the U. S. Express, so that shippers can have the benefit of through rates to all points by either Company . We recommend Mr Higgins to the public

 

5-6-81 1st ref. --- 3-30-83

C. H1GLEY C. O. D. MEAT MARKET

5-6-81 Chester Higley has bought the C. 0. D. meat Market of J. Houtcamp.

5-20-81 The Higley market in Douglas is in charge of J. Spears one of the best butchers in the country.

9-10-84 To supply the needs of his Douglas customers, J. Houtcamp has established a branch market next door to D. C. Putnams' Store, S. D. Nichols has charge of it.

1-7-81 Mrs E. D. Wilch of Douglas, who has had experience in the care of the sick, will engage as a nurse during the coming winter. Anyone desiring her services can call at the residence of Jas. Houtcamp, where she is staying at the present.

4-8-81 A Card . -- I desire to say through the Commercial that I have sold a half interest in my business both in Saugatuck and Douglas meat markets to Chester Higeley, of Ganges, in order to make the business more extensive and keep a larger stack of meats on hand. We now intend to keep the best of everything that belongs to a first class market, for which we will pay the cash and market prices. Buying and selling for cash we will compete with anyone. Thanking the public for their liberal patronage received, T respectfully ask a continuance of the same. J. A. Houtcamp.

5-6-81 A cARD. -- I wish to say to the public through the Commercial that I have sold out my interest in the C. 0. D. meat market and the Douglas market to Chester Higley, my late partner. All accounts for and against the firm will be settled by him. Thankful for past favors received by us, he asks the continuance of the same. Yours respectfully J. A. Houtcamp.

 

10-1-70 1st reference 12-2-71

DR. HOY -- Douglas -Physician, Surgeon

4-18-79 We understand Dr by, who formerly practiced medicine here ( Douglas), is to return to Saugatuck

1-23-80 Dr Hoy of this village, manufacturer of the Electro -Silver Plating that will make your plated ware if you have any, look good as new.

4-23-80 . Dr W. T. by was appointed Health Officer for the coming year.

 

2-18-71 DOUGLAS GRIST MILLS *3-18-71 ~ 12-2-71Grist mill and planing mill ads combined

J .S. PAYNE - GRIST MILL ROBB & GRAHAM -- PLANING MILL (McDonald had both in his mill before sold)

2-18-71 The grist mill formerly owned by C. McDonald, has changed hands J. S. Payne is now the proprietor

3-18-71 The Douglas Grist Mills have been refitted and are ready and able to do good Flouring and Custom Grinding. Try the mills once and judge for yourself of the quality of the work done by them. John S. Payne. Planing and matching at the Planing Mill in a satisfactory manner and on short notice by Robb & Graham

3-18-71 Mr. Payne bought the Douglas Mills in the early part of this year and with the assistance of Mr. E. Coon, the well known miller of Pier Cove, made the few changes needed in the mill Messrs. Robb and Graham, carpenters, have control of the planing mill under the grist mill .............. for the benefit of those coming with teams, Mr Payne is building a shed under which to drive for shelter from sunshine or storm

3-25-71 We noticed, in the cargo brought by the O R Johnson,Thursday, a hundred or more bags of wheat for the Douglas mills, showing that something is being done there.

6-10-71 Last Thurs the Sch 'Garabaldi' brought 550 bushels of corn to the Douglas grist mill

7-8-71 WOOL SHIPPING -- During this season about 3,000 lbs of wool have been bought by J. S. Payne and C. A. Ensign together, and shipped to Allegan. This is, we believe, the first time wool has been bought in Douglas for export.

8-19-71 John S. Payne paying $1.10 for good wheat last thurs.

6-10-71 Any order left at the Drug Store of Collier and Ensign in Saugatuck or Douglas for flour or feed will be promptly filled by J. S. Payne. He will deliver at any house in either corporation provisions ordered from the Douglas Mills.

 

8-10-77 1st adv. ~ 7-26-78

HUTCHINSON BROS. AND CO. (sometime between 1871 and 1877 Payne started partnership with Hutchinsons]

DOUGLAS FLOURING MILL, WAREHOUSE, BARREL FACTORY

8-31-77 FURNITURE STORE

John S. Payne of Douglas, invited us to take a look through the Furniture Store of Hutchinson Bros and Co., they have imported some burial caskets

Full sets of chamber and parlor and dining room furniture can now be had at home and at prices even below Grand Rapids.

10-5-77 Furniture Store West of Mill office of H. Moore under care of Horace Lord.

l0-l6-77 Hutchinson Bros, and Co fixing op their new store formerly occupied by Robert Close, where they intend to keep a larger stock of furniture than has ever been kept

11-2-77 Horace Lord -"Come up to the help of the 'Lord' against the mighty ! We mean Mr. Lord, of Douglas who has such a splendid lot of furniture to sell. He has sold heaps of it, but he has just received another invoice and has a lot more coming, which so fills his furniture store that you can't turn around in there, and he needs the room: so go and get some of it. Bear in mind that there is no 2d hand trash there: it is all new and of the latest patterns, and so cheap ! Well, go and see how cheap it is for such good goods.

11-9-77. The Grist Mill is running every day and part of the night,owing to the crowd of business. It is no unusual sight to see a dozen teams standing around the establishment, while some are going and coming 'constantly.

11-16-77 TheDouglas Furniture Store is filled right up with first class furniture, Anything to sit on, sleep on or eat off, or toned cases for thy final rest, can be bought at the lowest figures.

12-14-77 Monta C. Hutchinson starts for Colorado this week on account of ill health

3-l-78 Hutchinson and Bro have a new miller

5-3-78 Hutchinson Bros and Co, Proprietors of the Douglas Flouring Mills,keep constantly on hand a full stock of flour and feed,Corn and Oat meal . Custom work done on the shortest notice and satisfaction guaranteed .At the warehouse they are prepared to receive and ship peaches and apples,and od general warehouse business,they also have on hand and for sale Lime,Plaster,Stucco, Cement, Salt, & c. Their barrel factory is running a full crew, and they can furnish Apple barrels, in any quantity and at short notice. At prices which must be satisfactory. Good Apple barrels 30c, in quantities less than 25. Over 25 less than 100 28c, in quantities over 100 25c. At their furniture store the public is particularly invited their stock of furniture, just west of the mill office of Moores,under the care of Mr. Horace Lord, who is master of his businmss and is prepared to do any kind of work in his line. They have just received and will keep on hand a full line of bedsteads,bureaus, chairs,sofas, whatnots, etc. In short everything usually kept in a first class furniture store . Coffins on hand, or made to order.

5-25-78 Monta Hutchinson is back from winters visit to Colorado much improved in health.

7-26-78 85 cts is offered for new wheat at

7-26-78 are building a new addition to their mill,30x 35, four stories high. They will have 5 run of stone in their new building.

9-6-78 have the frame up for their new grist mill.

9-20-78 New mill progressing finely

9-27-78 .~.~new mill is a noticeable figure in the village, and is fast drawing toward completion

10-25-78 For the next 30 days we will sell our stock of furniture consisting of wood and cane seat chairs, bedsteads, and bedroom sets at net cost price for ready pay

11-11-78 have their mill nearly ready for the machinery.

11-20-78 Hutchinson and Bros sold nearly all of their furniture at Auction last Friday.

2-14-79 Hutchinson Bros are progressing rapidly with their new mill . When completed they will have the best Flouring Mill in West Michigan.

3~28-79 Hutchinson Bros and Co have leased the LOWER MILL of Gray and Crouse and will run it this season.

3~20~79,....are at work preparing their new mill for the machinery .They are to put in four runs of stone.

3-20-79 Monta Hutchinson starts for Colorado as soon as he is sufficiently recovered from his late dangerous illness to bear the journey.

4-11-79 Hutchinson Bros will pay cash for 1000 bushels of wheat.'

4-11-79 Chas Goodrich is repairing the 'Wade Place', E. D. Adams, Paynes' Boss Miller has leased it.

4~11-79 Hutchinson Bros and Co have secured the services of E. D. Adams, of Augusta, to superintend their flouring department .Mr Adams comes to them highly recommended as a miller.

5-2-79 Buy your Lime, Cement, and Brick, at the Grist Mill Warehouse in Douglas, If you want the cheapest and best. To the Public. ~Please call upon me at the Douglas Grist Mill, I believe I can do you more good than any man in my line in the country. E. D. Adams, New miller

6-8~79 Wool .Wool. We will pay cash and the market price for 20,000 lbs wool delivered in Douglas. Hutchinson Bros and Cm.

6-20-79 paying for wool 30ct/lb

7-4-79 Monta Hutchinson writes from Colorado Springs,that he feels as good as new, and has entirely recovered from the effects of the severe attack of hemorrhage that came so near proving fatal to him before his departure from here. He speaks in glowing terms of the country as a resort for those affected with lung difficulties.

9-19-79 Wheeler Collins and Monta Hutchinson are going in partnership in some business in Colorado.

11-l4-79 Monta Hutcthinson is in California with Dr MacLeans family.

12-19-79 Died in Oakland,California, Monta Hutchinson

10-8-80 The Douglas New Flouring Mill is now in full running order, and turning out a superior brand of flour. We would particularly give notice to the farming community that to all who have good sound, clean wheat ~we can give good satisfaction in the way of exchange from the new mill. But those who have dirty, musty or unsound grain we will grind in the old mill as formerly. Our capacity is now sufficient to grind all the grain grown within 20 miles of Douglas, so that none will be compelled to wait for a grist longer than it takes to make the exchange. We solicit a trial from all, more especially from all our former customers. Hutchinson Bros. and Co. Oct 4th 1880.

11-26-80 The first move Dutcher and Moore made after taking possession of the Douglas Mills, was to advance the price of wheat, two cents on the bushel.

1-7-81 T. C. Gray has sold out his store to J.A. Hutchinson and Co. The new firm is one well known to our readers as the old firm Hutchinson Bros. and Co., of the Douglas Flouring Mills. Jesse Hutchinson and John Payne are the owners of the Merchandise Bonanza,and both well known as men of enterprise and sagacity in business matters,They have a large capital to invest, and intend keeping a stock of goods, not to be excelled in this county~ J. W. Dickey, one of the best known salesmen in this region will have the management of that department, which alone ensures good sales.

l-7-81 The Douglas Flouring Mill has all the work it can do, and is steadily gaining favor with the farmers of adjoining towns.

l-l4-81 Moore and Dutcher Flouring mill,has been closed for two weeks while a $1000 worth of improvements have been made. A new purifier of improved design has been put in apparatus for making grits will soon be added,and in the spring a new boiler and engine of greater power than the one now it use will be put in. The flour made at the Douglas mill is now fully equal to the famous Zealand flour so well known to us, and all it needs is a trial to determine its merits.

2-4-81- Farmers driving up to the Douglas Flouring mill are requested to ring the bell to be seen at either of the outside doors

2-4-81 Mills shipped 100 bbls of flour to a firm in Milwaukee and has an order for 50 bbls of Graham flour from a firm in Chicago.

2-18-81 Moore and Dutcher will pay $1.25 per cord for hemlock wood delivered at their mill.

3-25-8l M and D shipped 500 barrels of flour to a Milwaukee firm this week- and 500 barrels to Richmond by wagon (or same load ?)

4-29-81 The 'Seaverns' came into port last Tuesday loaded with goods and supplies. She was the first boat to enter our port from Chicago this spring. She brought 600 bushels of corn for Moore and Dutcher.

5-6-81 Orders can be left at E.D. Billings for feed &c from the Douglas mills. All orders will be filled with promptness. Moore and Dutcher.

6-3~8l Moore and Dutcher are getting more orders from Chicago and Milwaukee for the Douglas mill flour than they can fill.

6-3-01 Moore and Dutcher' mill was entered by burglars last Saturday night, and the safe drilled and blown partly open . Something evidently frightened the thieves from their work as the job of opening the safe was not completed .There is no clue to the would be robbers. E. Takken is very anxious to explain that he had nothing to do with blowing open the gristmill safe, and says the burglars stole his tools to do the job with. All right, Ed, we'll take your word for it, only in the future, tie up your blacksmith shop.

7-8-81 No feed sold or exchange work done after 6 o'clock p.m. Moore and Dutcher.

7-15-81 Moore and Dutcher had an order this week for a 100 bbls of flour from eastern new york. Moores mill laid still part of this week .Some of the machinery got out of order and had to be sent to Chicago-- M and D bought a new lot of machinery for their grist mill this week ; a corn sheller of improved design, another run of stone and other improvements to their already first class mill.

7-15-81 We will pay $1.25 per cord for dry hemlock wood,and will buy 500 cords or more this fall; but it must e seasoned wood. Timber cut now from this seasons bark peeling would befit for our use this winter. Moore and Dutcher

7-22-8l M and D are putting new machinery in their mill this week, in consequence therof the mill is not running.

9-2-8l M and D sold H Walsh & Son of Holland ten tons of bran this week.

9-16-01 The Douglas mill ships from two to three hundred barrels of flour to Chicago per week.

10-14-81 By the appearance of their delivery wagon on our streets,it would seem that Moore and Dutcher have a good custom in this village.

11-4-81 Moore and Dutcher are building a new arch,and in connection with it are putting in one of Gerbers patent ovens, for burning tan bark and sawdust. The mill will lay still a week

l-6-82 Moore and Dutcher have put up what they call a "Big Indian" spark catcher,which is a success. The larger sparks are retained until consumed. Every mill, steamer, or tug should have one.

1-13-82 The Gristmill caught fire on Thursday night in the engine room, supposedly from a spark from the arch, But owing to the opportune arrival of George Dutcher, the fire was discovered and extinguished before it had time to cause any damage.

1-27-82 The smoke stack of Moore and Dutchers mill blew down during the gale last Saturday . It was replaced this week

6-23-82 For Sale.-- Having made up my mind to go west, I wish to dispose of my five year old driving horse, top buggy,single buggy and 'harness,also a heavy black mare 7years old, and a nearly new double wagon and harness. will sell low for cash. J. S. Payne.

8-18-82- Mr John S.Payne, of Douglas, is about ready for removal, he is going to Englewood, Ill, with his family on Sunday evenings boat.

8-25-82 John S. Payne and family took Monday evenings boat for Englewood, Ill where Mr. P. will go into business.

 

5-20-81

J. E. HUTCHINSON AND CO. (John Payne, partner)

5-20~01 J. E~ Hutchinson and Co., have succeeded in getting the agency of the boss sewing machine . [The Davis]

6-17-81 Wool is beginning to come in and J. E. Hutchinson and Co are the heaviest buyers.

7-1-81 ....are selling oleomargarine.

11-4-81 Warren Gill is the new salesman at and he makes a good one.

11-4-81We would be pleased to say to our many customers that we have secured the services of another salesman and will try and not keep you waiting hereafter. J. E. Hutchinson and Co.

l-6-8l John S. Payne, the retiring partner of the firm J. E. Hutchinson and Co., goes to Silver City, New Mexico, on a prospecting tour . Our old townsmen C. E. Ensign is located there and pronounces the country one of marvelous wealth.

2-17-82 Sixteen bars of soap for 50c ; five cakes full sized stove polish for 15c; three boxes Bay State Washing Powder for 25c.

3-24-82 Kerosene Oil ~ pure water white at 16c; 10 yeast cakes for 6c; good lamp chimneys 3c; saleratus for 5c; that is what cash does at

3-31-82 J. E. H. has the first cord binder ever brought to this place. Will Dickey will tell you all about it.

6-16-82 FULL FRONT PAGE BLOCK ADVW.

(7-14-82 Partnership Notice.-I would herewith inform my many customers that Mr Frank Kirby has been admitted into the partnership with the undersigned, under the firm name of J. E. Hutchinson and Co., and respectfully request a continuance of the patronage so liberally bestowed in the past . Very Respectfully, J. E. Hutchinson.

8-18-82 Miss Sue Breuckman is clerking in J. E. Hutchinsons store during the dull season of the millenery trade.

10-6-82 Full front page adv.

11-3-82 Full page adv.

11-24-82 Mr Will Dickey, well and favorably known through his long connection with the house of J. E. Hutchinson & Co. of Douglas, has severed his connection with that house and will devote his time to the boot and shoe business of Taber, Hogan & Co., Buffalo NY

12-1-82 FULL PAGE ADV.

3-2-83 Full page adv.

3-23-83 BUTTER MAKERS,Take Notice. ~~On and after the 2d day of April, 1883, we shall adopt the system of grading butter and pay for it according to quality .Every year we have lost a great deal of money on account of poor butter, and are compelled,in justice to ourselves,to adopt this plan and trust that no one will take offense if we disagree with them in regard to the grade of their butter. J. E. Hutchinson and Co. Dyer C. Putnam.

6-l8-70 1st reference -10-21-71

JOHN KIRBY -Harnesses, Water st., Douglas

8-19-71 Water St graded from Gerber Tannery to the top of the hill near Kirby Harness Shop

11 -16-77 LS'C A DV. 12-7-77 - 12-27-78

JOHN KIR BY - DOUGLAS HARNESS SHOP

11-16-77 I wish to announce to my friends, and to the public, that I still run the Douglas Harness shop, and from this time out can be found at my post, ready to make new work, or to repair old, in a good and substantial manner, and at fair prices. John Kirby, Douglas.

4-l 1-79 John Kirby is fitting up the building formerly occupied by Dr. MacLean, as a drug store,for a harness shop.

9-2-81 Miss Belle Finn of Allegan is visiting her sister, Mrs J. H. Kirby

 

10-22-70 1st reference

HIRAM LEE BLACKSMITH - Douglas

10-22-70 Mr. Hiram Lee sold his blacksmith shop to E. Takken

 

8-29-68 to 2-18-71

McDONALD FLOURING MILL -- DOUGLAS

Mr. McDonald, formerly of the firm McDonald and Putnam, is now building a Flouring Mill on the bank of the river at the east end of Center St. The dimensions of the mill are as follows: 26 feet by 36 feet; two stories and a half high, with an engine room 20 feet square, two runs of stone, with capacity to grind 250 bushels per day. McDonald designs to have the mill in running condition by October next. This is surely an improvement to Douglas worthy of note, and will be a great accommodation to the farming community of that beautiful farming country all south of Douglas. The success of Mr. McDonalds' enterprise promises well.' 11-21-b8 McDonalds' Flouring Mill will be ready for grinding next week. This institution is going to be or considerable benefit to Douglas. The wheat and corn raised South of this place which has been handed to Allegan to be ground, will come this way as it is nearer thereby diverting a trade from Allegan to this place worth thousands of dollars to the business men. ( Bridge had not been built yet)

4-3-69 Mr. McDonald is about to put a planing machine in his Grist mill - see Robb and Graham - and Walker.

8-6-70 McDonald has a number of splendid black walnut newel posts just made

8-b-70 **McDonald and Johnson have entered into partnership and will carry on the grist and planing mill at the old stand

7-30-70 The Douglas Grist mill is ready to do grinding in the best style -- having been lately been refitted thoroughly

1-21-71 McDonald and Johnson are busily grinding

2-18-71 The grist mill formerly owned by C. McDonald, has changed hands J. S. Payne is now the proprietor

 

7-16-68 to 12-19-68`McDONALD and PUTNAM --Dry Goods, Groceries, Douglas

8-22-1868 Putnam breaks partnership with McDonald at store, by mutual consent ?, store now to be run alone by Putnam

 

7-30-70 1st reference -- 4-22-71

C. MACDONALD --FURNITURE STORE - S.E. corner Fremont and water sts -Douglas

7-30-70 We see that C. McDonald has opened a new Furniture Store in the building formerly occupied by L. D. Buck. He shows a good assortment of Tables, Bedsteads, Cribs, Center tables, and many other things we have not space to mention. All these goods are of his own make, and are warranted. He intends to keep everything in his tine as low as any other dealer in this section,

4-22-71 Stephen D Nichols lately started a meat market in the store formerly occupied by L. D. Buck, and later by C. McDonald and Co., as a Furniture Store --- Douglas

 

10-16-77, new blk ad 11-16-77, ~ 5-10-78 ad ceases

MRS L. H. McDONALD -MILLENERY -DOUGLAS

10-16-77 Mrs. L. H, McDonald and Co. have opened a Millenery and Ladies Furnishing Store, next door to D. C. Putnams' store in Douglas. They have secured the services of Mrs Finn of Allegan, and are prepared to do all kinds of work in their line

11-16-77 Millenery Store in Douglas, L H McDonald and Co, have opened a new stock of Millenery and ladies furnishing goods, next door to D. C. Putnams store in Douglas. (and solicit a call from all in need of goods in Cheer line. We sell strictly for cash, and guarantee satisfaction (compare Breuckman 11-16-77) 7-25-79 L. H. McDonald and Co., think of removing theer stock of millenery goods to Olivet.

8-1-79 will remove their stock of millenery from Douglas next week Mrs L. A. Putnam on account of her removal to Olivet....

 

1st ref. 4-18-79 ~ 8-27-80

MOREY BROS . --MEAT MARKET ( shop opp. Moores Mill Office)

 

4-18-79 Blk Adv Douglas Meat Market Morey Bros Prop's . We keep constantly on hand a choice stock of the best cut meats. We guarantee satisfaction and have regulated our Price to Suit the Times. Meats delivered by our wagon at your homes. Shop opposite Moores Mill Office.

5-23-79 The Morey Bros, have leased the old Washington Market of S. D, Nichols,and will move in the first of the week.

6-6-79 The Morey Bros are giving good satisfaction in their meat market in Saugatuck . Their meats are first class and well cut.

6-27-79 Morey Bros meat market is open till 9 o'clock Sun morning. -- If you want a chicken for your Sunday dinner, call at Moreys market and order it Sat morning.

7-18-79 The Morey Bros, through Cheer inability to secure harvesters to take care of Cheer wheat crop on their farm in Ganges, have closed both their Saug and Doug Markets . Both will be in full blast again as soon as harvest is over.

7-25-79 Morey have reopened their Douglas Market, their Saugatuck market opens next week ~ @8-1-79 Morey Bros, say they are doing a larger business in Douglas since harvest time than anytime heretofore. James Bear has bought 1/3 interest in thier Saugatuck / Douglas markets.

9-26-79The Morey Bros have teased the City Meat Market of Geo Walz and will also run the Washington and :Douglas Markets. This firm, in the year that they have done business here, have always been known as fair dealers and deserve the large share of patronage which they are getting.

10-10-79 Morey Bros take possession of the City Meat Market today. .

1-16-80 The Morey Bros are running their meat wagon in Douglas three times a week, Tues., Thurs., and Sots.

4-2-80 Miss Emma Morey and Miss Lora Gilbert have started dressmaking over the Meat Market in Douglas, you will find them hereafter always on hand to take orders for dressmaking and they will warrant satisfaction on any kind of dress cutting or fitting. Give us a call at our rooms apposite H. B. Moons Office. 4-1b-80 Geo Walz put a stone basement under the building occupied by the Morey Bros [City Meat Market] as a meat market

5-7-80 The Morey Bros are making use of Cheer refrigerator.

6-5-80 Morey Bros have opened the City Market again, and will now sell cheap for cash. They will not be undersold.

6-11-80 Morey Bros have a full supply of vegetables, and will receive them tri-weekly by the Heath through the summer.

9-10-80 James Perry of Ganges, has bought the building in Douglas, formerly occupied by the Morey Bros as a meat market, and converted it into a fruit drying establishment.

 

4-2-80 1st reference

MOREY AND GILBERT - MILLENERY

4-2-80 Miss Emma Morey and Miss Lora Gilbert have started dressmaking over the Meat Market in Douglas you will find there hereafter always on hand to take orders for dressmaking and they will warrant satisfaction on any kind of dress cutting or fitting. Give us a call at our rooms opposite H. B. Moons Office.

4-30-80 The Misses Morey and Gilbert are hawing good success in their dressmaking business in Douglas, and would solicit the further patronage of the ladies of Douglas.

5-7-80 Call at Miss Moreys' dressmaking rooms . Plattes and Books of the latest summer styles just received.

 

7-23-801st reference

BARNY NAPIFR - DOUGLAS LIVERY

7-23-80 Douglas is to have a livery stable. Barny Napier of St Joseph will start one there next week, and we predict that the enterprise will be a success.

6-8-77 to 2-1-78 and 8-2-78 to 5-23-79

C. W. NEWTON -CARRIAGE PAINTER, Douglas

Carriage painter. Paper Hanging,Graining, Painting in all its branches

2-22-70 Mr. John Priest has just completed a new delivery wagon for Taylor and Barber . It is made of the very best material and is a model of beauty. C. W. Newton does the painting.

4-26-78 Painter, and Paper Hanger. orders left at C. E. Bird's Drug Store promptly attended to.

8-9-78 Get your work done by a practical painter. No cheating! C. W. Newton would inform the farmers and others that he is prepared to paint wagons at greatly reduced prices for cash! as follows : Large wagons, lumber, etc., 2 coats of lead, striped and varnished $8.00 ;Democrats,2 coats, and finishing up to look as new 8.00 ; Buggies from 5.00 to 20.00 ; Cutters from 3.00 to 15.00.

11-1-78 We understand Messrs Newton and Walker are fitting up the Hall of the Eagle House in view of having dramatic entertainments through the winter

3-14-79 "I wish to inform my friends and customers that I am in Douglas -- in the painting business. Carriage painting in particular. I am not working for Mr Takken, nor have I been for the last 18 months or more. Mr Takkens representations nevertheless ."

4~18-79 C. W. Newton is in Ganges,doing several jobs of painting .His 'right bower', Nat Firman is with him.

5-2-79 Doc MacLean is doing considerable in the line of improvements in and around the Douglas Drug Store this spring. We notice a new sign,painted by that 'boss' artist, C. W. Newton

3~5~80 C. W. Newton is in town . He is working for Geo. Thomas painting. Mr Thomas has a large number of jobs on hand of old and new work, and Newton is to finish them up.

4-9-80 A. H. Ehle is having his house repainted and its looks does credit to those artists of the brush C. W. Newton and N. Firman.

6-5-00 J. H. Kibbys new sign "Douglas House", which serves as a guide to that pleasant hostelry, does credit to the painter C. W. Newton.

11-12-88 C.W. Newton went to the Rapids this week to hire a blacksmith for Takken Bros. They are having all the work they can do this fall.

1-14-81 C.W. Newton left Douglas for Allegan this week. He is engaged in fitting up a traveling troupe and will show through the state. The troupe will be fitted up in a month and will hail from Douglas.

7-30-1869 1st reference

S. D. NICHOLS STORE - sometime town meeting place

8-28-69 Mr Nichols has a new sign in front of his meat market

4-22-71 Washington Meat Market ~corner Butler and Hoffman sts " a full supply of choice beef, pork, mutton, veal. Fresh fish and vegetables will be kept on hand during their season. Everything sold will be of good and fair price. Cash paid for livestock. S D Nichols

4-22-71 Stephen D Nichols lately started a meat market in the store formerly occupied by L. D. Buck, and later by C. McDonald and Co., as a Furniture Store ---Washington Meat Market, Douglas

5-6-71 New Ad- Washington Meat Market. S. D. Nichols corner of Hoffman and Butler Saug. Corner of Fremont and Water-- Douglas

7-27-77 S. D. Nichols is having a new sidewalk laid around his lot on Butler St.

10-31-79 A.W.Walker of Douglas has bought the Nichols Building (Saugatuck or Douglas ?) and is fitting it up for a residence.

9-10-80 To supply the needs of his Douglas customers, J. Houtcamp has established a branch market next door to D. C. Putnam's Store, S.D. Nichols has charge of it.

4-22-81 The old Nichols Building on Butler St., is being raised and new sills put under it. The W. C. T. U. will occupy it with their reading rooms during the summer.

7-l-81 The ladies of the Cong Ch will furnish warm dinners next Monday, on the grounds adjoining the Nichols building and Commercial office. The W. C. T. U. rooms in the Nichols bldg will be opened to the public as sitting rooms free of charge.

3-10-82 S. D. Nichols has an apoplectic seizure at C. E. Bird's drug store last Wednesday. For a while his life was despaired of but he seems to have fully recovered from the seizure.

6-1 1-80

URI NICHOLS -SHOE AND BOOTS -DOUGLAS -over Drug Store

6-11-80 Uri Nichols is located over the Douglas Drug Store, and is working at his old trade of Shoe and Boot making. Mr Nichols is a 1st class boot maker and is well known in this vicinity.

10-22-88 Do you want a boss pair of boots that fit? Nichols makes them in Douglas.

2-4-81 Uri Nichols the Douglas shoemaker has started for New Caledonia, South Africa

4-21-82 Blk Adv - JOHN NIES, Dealer in IRON, STEEL, NAILS, STOVES, AGRICULTURAL IMPLEMENTS, TINWARE, PUMPS, AND STEAM FITTINGS, BARBED WIRE, DOORS AND SASH, OILS AND PAINTS, ALABASTINE, ETC. SAUGATUCK MICH.

4-28-82 Douglas -Work on the building Mr Nies is to occupy is progressing rapidly, and begins to look like a building . It will be enclosed this week.

6-23-82 Douglas -- The hardware store is not running yet, but the goods have come.

l-12-03 The Common Sense Washmachine for sale at....Ask Mrs James Elliott about them.

3-9-03 John Nies is agent for the Hamburg and New York steamship line, connecting with all the railroad lines. Also foreign money orders issued from this office.

 

N1ES DOUGLAS HARDWARE

6-30-02 Notice! I would inform my friends in Douglas and vicinity that my hardware store is now open and well stocked with everything belonging to a first class hardware store. Mr John Koning, for the past eight years in my employ, is in charge. I respectfully solicit a share of your patronage. John Nies.

9-29-82 If you want a nice cook or parlour stove call at the Douglas Hardware Store.

2-18-83 Remember this is the last week of the closing out sale of the Douglas Hardware Store. ,

2-18-83 Closing Out At Cost. The last week and the last chance to get bargains. Shelf Hardware, Cutlery, all kinds of tinware, Cook and Parlor stoves, at cost until Feb 24. Come now and get your goods at the Douglas Hardware Store.- John Koning.

2-23-83 The voice of the hardware man will no longer be heard in our midst, the 'pulling up' process commencing on Monday next.

 

9-12-79 1st reference

DR. S. H. PARKS

9-32-79 Dr S. H. Parks, of St. Joseph made us a pleasant call last Tuesday . The Dr. talks of locating here . He is a Homeopathist and has met with excellent success in his practice in St Joseph.

9-19-79 S. H. Parks, Physician and Surgeon, has permanently located in Douglas. His office will be at Dr MacLeans old stand at the Douglas Drug Store. He will be at the Commercial Office from 10 to 11 a.m. each day.

9-19-79 Dr S, H. Parks is being introduced by Dr. MacLean, to the patients that his departure for California necessitates leaving on the sick list.. Dr. Parks is a graduate of Rush Medical College in Chicago and also the Hahneman Homeopathic College of Chicago,and comes to us well recommended from various quarters.

9-26-79 Dr S. H. Parks is meeting with a good success is his practice and is well liked by the patients that he has so far attended.

10-24-79 Dr Parks has bought the Updyke place in Douglas, and will occupy it as a residence.

11-14-79 Dr Parks is putting up a new barn at his place in Douglas.

11-14-79 Dr. Parks wishes to inform his patrons in Saugatuck that it is impossible for him to fill his hour each day, therefor those wishing his services will have to leave orders at his office in Douglas until further notice.

12-12-79 Dr Parks has been appointed Township Officer of Health by the Board.

3-10-81 Mrs Woodhull : I wish you to announce in your paper the gratitude and many thanks I owe Dr. Parks for his kindness and skill in saving the life of my daughter, and would recommend him to all who might need the services of a skillful physician. Mrs F. G. Slack

2-17-82 Dr J.F.Young has bought out Dr Parks --- house, lot, horse, carriage, office and all. Dr Parks will go to Colorado in the hopes that his wife's health will be benefited by the change.

5-12-82 Dr. Parks has settled in Idaville, In after an extensive tour of the territories

 

21-4-8l

JOHN H. PAYNE

11-4-81 John H. Payee, Fire Insurance Agent. represents 13 first class Companies. losses paid at home through county agents.

 

8-19-71 1st reference

JOHN S PAYNE STORE - Douglas

8-19-71 work on J Payees new store going on rapidly

 

9-l0-80

JAMES PERRY - FRUIT DRYING EVAPORATOR

9-10-80 James Perry of Ganges, has bought the building in Douglas, formerly occupied by the Morey Bros as a meat market, and converted it into a fruit drying establishment.

10-1-80 Perry's Evaporator is an institution that should be well appreciated, by the people of Douglas, and the fruit growers in the surrounding country. ; not only does it give employment in the busy season to from 30 to 40 hands but also furnishes a home market for large quantities of shier apples and peaches, which they would otherwise be compelled to ship to Chicago or some other equally distant market. The immediate fruit drying part of his establishment consists of a vertical trunk 45 feet high, and five foot one inch by five foot eight inch, divided into two evaporating flues by a partial partition. At the top and bottom of this trunk are two large wheels on shafts, which are connected by chains passing around their circumference; between these chains, light screen like frames are suspended hich form trays on which the fruit is placed after having been pared and cut. At the bottom of this trunk is a large furnace, much like a modern church furnace, the heat from which ascending through the evaporating flues, form a temperature within the trunk of 230 degrees Fahrenheit. When the fruit is first placed in the trunk, it is lowered down immediately over the furnace end subjected to a high degree of heat, but as it is gradually dried it is raised in the opposite flue until it reaches the top where it again descends and is taken out of the same door it entered . At the bottom of the trunk and on top of the furnace, so that its fumes may rise among the fruit, brimstone is kept burning continuously for the purpose of bleaching the fruit [sulphur dioxide). When his evaporator is run to its full capacity Mr Perry can dry 150 bushels of apples or 85 bushels of peaches per day, and those are almost exclusively consumed in a foreign market.

9-23-51 Wanted . -- Windfall apples fit for paring at Perry's dry house Douglas -- Bring your windfall apples to Perrys Dry house. -- A cider mill will be run in connection with Perry's Dry House after this date . Custom work solicited.

 

11-25-71 1st ref, ~ 12-2-71

MRS. M. H. POPPLEWELL DOUGLAS MILLINERY

 

7-16-68 to 12-2-71 6-8-77 1st ref 5-9-79 [4-23-80 to 10-29-80) [ 6-9-82 to 8-11-82) [3-13-83 to 3-30-83]

DYER C. PUTNTAM - Dry Goods and Groceries and Notary Public at Post Office (68-71)

8-22-1868 Putnam breaks partnership with McDonald at store, by mutual consent ?, stare now to be run alone by Putnam

9-3-70 J. Gerber and Son have sold their store to Dyer C. Putnam

8-12 71 another store (Gen. Merchandise ) does $20,000 / annum business, the Post Office is in this store

6-8-77 D. C. Putnam of Douglas has a full stock of Dry Goods, Groceries, Boots and Shoes, Hats and Caps, Crockery, Glassware, and other articles usually kept in a country store, for sale cheap for cash. He has secured the services of his old clerk Mr. J. W. Dickey, and patrons are informed that their wants will be attended to with dispatch

7-27-77 Clerk William Carver

6-28-78 D. C, Putnam thinks himself fully qualified for at least hand-before-the-mast, since his experience upon the 'Brittain' in her attempt to make this port during the recent storm. 2-14-79 Will Carver has left D. C. Putnam to go West.

1.3-14-79 Dyer C. Putnam of Douglas, has secured the agency for the unrivaled American Sewing Machine. These machines with their new improvements, have 20 advantages over other makes, and are by far the most durable of any make.

6-20-79 Lime, lath shingles for sale at....

8-8-79 Call at Putnam's and interview Dickey in regard to those new goods 8-29-79 Will Dickey clerk at Putnam's

9-l2-79 Tarletan.-- Putnam has sold tarletan enough this season to cover 95,000 peach baskets,and is still making large sales.

10-31-79 ..looks like a 1st class jewelry store since he has got his new stock of clocks on . ~~~~Stove black that only has to be shook at a stove to make it shine at.....

4-23-80 Blk Adv .-Dyer C. Putnam at the Old Stand,Douglas, Mich has a full line of Hats,Caps, clothing, boots and shoes, dry goods, groceries, hardware, crockery, wall and window paper, etc, etc. Agricultural implements, Steel plows, curtiss plows, gale chilled lows, diamond iron lows, plow points, plow landsides, plow moulboards, single shovel plows,double shove plows, three shovel plows, five tooth cultivators. All kinds of mewing machines, lath, shingles, cedar posts, barbed fence wire,Walter A. Woods' Mower and Road scrapers. Greenbacks, Silver, Gold, Butter, Eggs and Farm Produce wanted in exchange for goods.

8-5-80 D.C.Putnam is moving the building that he has used for the storage of agricultural implements up next to his store building,and will occupy it for a post office and boot and shoe store. It is a move that will be appreciated by the people of Douglas, as it will bring the post office in a more desirable location.

6-11-80 Putnam intends to put up a neat shed to the left of his boot and shoe store for the storage of Agric. implements.

6-25-80 Putnam intends to put in the largest stock in Allegan Co. as soon as his new store room is finished.

7-16-80 Miss Ella Washburn has returned from her visit to Olivet, and has resumed her place at Putnam's Store.

7-18-00 Putnam has an addition to his store nearly completed to contain a new patent post office that was recently ordered from Maine. Also boots and shoes.

7-30-80 D. C. Putnams's addition to his store is nearly completed with commendable enterprise ha has placed a street lamp in front of his building to guide the footsteps of the citizens of Douglas thereto. The new postal delivery case just inside the door is very convenient to the public and an ornament to the office.

9-10-80 To supply the needs of his Douglas customers, J. Houtcamp has established a branch market next door to D. C. Putnam's Store, S. D. Nichols has charge of it.

12-24-80 Now is the time to secure great bargain in shoe leather. I have a box of wool lined shoes lost from the steamer 'Alpena', which I bought at a bargain, and I will give the public the benefit .Call early and secure a pair of shoes cheap.

1-14-81 Henry Walbrecht is again clerking at D. C. Putnam,s, and will be pleased to see all his old friends T. C. Grays books are at the store of D.C Putnam, in charge of Henry Walbrecht. Those indebted to him can call there and settle.

5-27-81- To my patrons I have bought out Hutchinsons and Cos shelf hardware and sold them my crockery, and now we can both keep a better stock in our respective lines. I shall make additions to my hardware stock and try to meet your wants promptly .D. C. Putnam.

7-1-81 Storm painted a light slate color with darker trimmings

9-2-81 Mr, A. J. Enoch, of Rockford, Ill is visiting his daughter, Mrs D. C. Putnam

11-4-81 I have another lot of shingles only $1 per M.

1-6-82 Johnnie Miller, ofGrand Rapids, is home visiting for a few days . He has been clerking in D. C. Putnam's store for the past year.

5-l2-82 I have enlarged my implement room and can show you a good assortment of plows, single and double shovels, plow extras of all kinds, &c.

8-25-82 Mr Fred Brown long association with Putnam to East Toledo,Oh for a while

3-9-83 If you want F. S .Sprague, Sr., you will find him behind Putnam's counters in Douglas.

3-9-03 Mr Henry Wallbrecht, who has been Putnam's right bower for some time back, will practice "treading the decks" of a steamer on the rolling billows of Lake Michigan the coming season. He has secured the clerks berth on the steamer Douglas.

3-23-83 BUTTER MAKERS, Take Notice. -On and after the 2d day of April, 1883, we shall adopt the system of grading butter and pay for it according to quality. Every year we have lost a great deal of money on account of poor butter, and are compelled, in justice to ourselves, to adopt this plan and trust that no one will take offense if we disagree with them in regard to the grade of their butter. J. E. Hutchinson and Co. - Dyer C. Putnam.

 

6-1-77 to 3-30-83

SAMUEL C. REED - BLACKSM ITH -Douglas

Blacksmith and Wagonshop Samuel Read Manufacturer of Light and heavy wagons, carriages, buggies, cutters, sleighs, log wagons, etc. Blacksmithing of all kinds. All work warranted.

3-23-83 S. C. Reed of Douglas will try farming for a year.

3-30-83 Notice ! Feeling it necessary for the benefit of my health to leave my shop for a year, I wish to thank the people of Saugatuck and Douglas, and the surrounding country, for their liberal patronage during the eight years that I have been here. Having rented the shop to Mr Thomas, and he having employed Mr J. H. Jones, who has been with me the past year, I know that he will give satisfaction in all departments of the business, and can recommend him to all my old customers . S. C. Reed.

 

11-21-79 1st reference

REED AND THOMAS - DOUGLAS

11-21-79 Plummer has had anew covered buggy built especially for carrying the mail . It was built by Reed and (George) Thomas of Douglas.

3-5-80 C.W.Newton is in town. He is working for Geo Thomas painting. Mr Thomas has a large number of jobs on hand of old and new work, and Newton is to finish them up.

 

7-16-70 1st reference 12-24-70 ( 4-1-71 to 12-2-71) (started in lower level of Paynes grist mill later started own shop which preceeded basket factory]

A. ROBB & C. W. GRAHAM --Wood and Building

7-16-70 A. Robb has taken C. W. Graham into partnership, will do any and all kinds of planning, making of doors, or building of any kind ~~they are putting new machinery in their shop Robbs' Dry Kiln works splendidly, lumber green and wet will in from three to five days be perfectly seasoned, without being warped or in any way injured.

7-30-78 New firm! New shop! New Machinery! Having lately built a new shop and fitted it up with new machinery and tools we are ready to do builders work of any kind. Sash, Doors and Blinds. furnished at short notice. To the making of coffins we will give particular attention,and with a Large force of good workmen! We can fill any order for them in the shortest time possible. Connected with our shop we have a new drying kiln,in which, without warping,we can thoroughly season green lumber in a few hours

3-25-71 Robb and Graham are preparing material for the new church, work will be pushed forward as soon as possible as soon as weather permits.

4-15-71 R & G are to make a large case or library for the purpose of holding the library and apparatus of the Douglas Union School

6-20-71 About the 1st of July next, a new furniture store is to be opened by a new firm Robb, Graham and Co. A new building for the store is to be begun at once. It will be 22 X 36 feet and stand on the corner of Center and Water sts, near the Douglas Grist Mill.

7-1-71 Last Tues, R & G began building a house for Harry B. Moore, of Douglas, north of the Union School House

7-8-71 The frame for a new building to be built near the drug store is being put in shape by R & G. The bldg is to be used as a store

8-60-71 Washington St graded by R & G s shop

 

1-12-83 1st reference

E. SCHOONARD --SHOE SHOP

1-12-83 E. Schoooard, of Johnstown, has opened a shoe shop in Douglas. He can be found with the harness maker.

 

4-3-69

M.B.SPENCERS WAREHOUSE,SAUGATUCK / DOUGLAS

Land Plaster will be kept constantly on hand at M. B. Spencers' warehouses in Saugatuck and Douglas J.N.Upham

 

10-22-70 1st reference 12-2-7K

E.TAKKEN ---BLACKSMITH - Douglas

10-22-70 Mr. H. Lee sold his blacksmith shop to E. Takken

12-24-70 We see that E. Takken & Bro. are as busy as bees in their blacksmith and wagon shop, turning out work for 1hwkummberoxmm.They are getting a heavy run of work, and the fact that none but the best material is allowed to go into anything they make there, and that they are both experienced workmen is spreading rapidly.

1-7-71 Takken Bros., Douglas, Mich., Wagon-makers and Blacksmiths. Light or Heavy Wagons, Log Rigs, Sleighs, Bobs,Cutters, constantly on hand, or made to order on the shortest notice. None but the best timber used, Carriage ironing and Horseshoeing

4-8-71 E.Takken and Bro. want a boy, or to speak without offending, a young gentlemen 16-20 years old, to work for them and learn the trade of blacksmith, the chance is decidedly a good one.

6-3-71 Takken Bros building a wagon for J. Nies and Levi Loomis of Ganges

 

6=-1-77 to 8-29-79 - 12-17-80 to 10-21-81

HENRY AND EDWARD TAKKEN -BLACKSMKTHS

Carriage and Blacksmith Shop. Mesrs. Henry and Edward Takken are now prepared to do all kinds of Carriage and Blacksmith work. Henry Takken gives his personal attention to the manufacture of Wagons, Buggies, Sulkies, Buckboards, etc. Would call especial attention to his Centennial Fruit Wagon, which has no superior in this country. Ed Takken is boss in the Blacksmith Shop, which is complete in all its branches, and by superior workmanship and low prices he feels confident of meriting the public patronage. Shipsmithing done on a workmen like manner. Repairing of all kinds including farm machinery and tools done on short notice, and all Work warranted. Horse- Shoeing a specialty.

11-16-77 Henry Takken of Douglas has the finest lot of cutters on hand to be found in the county at 20% below former prices.

11-30-77 House and Lot for sale. ~Being in great need of a few hundred dollars at once. I will sell my house and lot in Saugatuck for $500. $300 cash and balance on time. This property cost, and is worth $1200, but I must sacrifice on something and have chosen this property for that purpose. For particulars inquire of Ed Takken in Douglas or at the Commercial office

6-28-70 E. Takken is agent for the Seymour Mower .v

6-20~70 . is building an addition to his blacksmith shop, to be used as a warehouse for agricultural implements.

7-26-78- is making arrangements to procure a steam pleasure yacht

12-6-78 H.Takken, E. Takken, and P. DeSpelder of Douglas, have formed a co-partnership, under the firm of Takken Bros and Co., for the purpose of carrying on the wagon and carriage manufacturing business on an extensive scale. They have a large stock of iron and wood on hand and are now prepared to turn out 1st class work at low rates.

3-28-79 On Mon last we made a call at the carriage works of Takken Bros and Co of Douglas, and found them hard at work and with plenty of it to do We first stepped into the blacksmith shop which is under the charge of Ed Takken and found him busy ironing wagons we are indebted to him for a number of intricate jobs of repairing our press we next stopped into the woodworking department, here we found Peter deSpelder, the junior member of the firm. Mr deSpelder has been in the company of Henry Takken for the past 6 years and is a 1st class mechanic we then went upstairs to the paint shop, here we found Henry Takken, the senior member of the firm. The firm of Takken Bros and Co, was organized last November

6-20-79 E Takken has a new Seymour mower which he wishes to sell or exchange for a colt . Good terms given

8-20-79 E. Takken is raising his house and putting a new stone wall under it.

12-5-79 Takken Bros and Co of Douglas have fitted up a room adjoining their blacksmith shop,for a wagon shop.

11-12-80 C. W. Newton went to the Rapids this week to hire a blacksmith for Takken Bros. They are having all the work they can do this fall.

5-6-81 Started in 1871, 1878 Mr Peter DeSpelder joined firm under its present name {Takken Bros and Co} They now have a force of 5 or 6 men constantly employed in their wood, blacksmithing and paint shops. Their buggies wagons cutters and sleighs are unexcelled in strength style and finish. Agents for 'Chubb's Chilled Tooth Plows', Spring Tooth Harrow' they also sell corn planters, cultivators, feed cutters and other implements have been unable to keep up with demand for new manufr. In the last three years

6-3-81 Moore and Dutchers' mill was entered by burglars last Saturday night, and the safe drilled and blown partly open. Something evidently frightened the thieves from their work am the job of opening the safe was not completed . There is no clue to the would be robbers. E. Takken is very anxious to explain that he had nothing to do with blowing open the gristmill safe, and says the burglars stole his tools to do the job with. All right, Ed, we'll take your word for it, only in the future, tie up your blacksmith shop.

10-7-81 Takken Bros and Co wish to inform their customers that they are still ready to make wagons, buggies, cutters, sleighs,,etc. of any kind or style at prices that cannot be beat by any reliable manufacturer. Repairing a specialty .Already for horseshoeing,Only agents in Allegan Co for Colemans Pat. Plow Harness . Call and see them

5-19-82 Ed Takken has applied for letters patent on his buggy- his own invention .We hope it will prove a big bonanza to him

3-2-83 Died in Douglas,Feb 28th, of scarlet fever, Mary DeSpelder, in the fourth year of her age.

3-23-83 E. Takken buggies go like J. Schabergs hot cakes, he sold a nice buggy before he had them in the shop five hours.

3-23-83 Takken and DeSpelder have leased the store-room opposite their shop for their large stock of buggies which are constantly arriving.

3-23-83 Takken and DeSpelder would hereby inform their many friends and patrons that they have put in blacksmith department, and have engaged an experienced blacksmith to tend all work in that line, which will be done on short notice.

3-23~83 New Blk Adv

 

9-18-7O 1st reference -1-28-71

WILLIAM UP8ON ---Livery, Douglas

 

1st ref. 5-2-79 --l2-26-?9

NELL UPSON - MILLENERY

4-25-79Miss Nellie Upson,of Douglas, has gone to Chicago for a stock of spring millenery goods Miss Nellie served her apprenticeship last year with one of the leading millenery firms of Kalamazoo, and from samples we have seen of her work, we can cheerfully recommend her to the public .She will remain a week in the establishment of Gage Bros. and Co `to perfect herself in the spring styles, and will return in time to have a Grand Opening May 1st. She is to have the pleasant rooms over Dr. MacLeans Drug Store.

5-2-79 Miss Nell Upson has opened her millenery rooms over the Douglas drug store, where she will be pleased to see you.

5-2-79 Blk Adv- Spring Millenery. I have opened my millenery rooms over Dr MacLeans drug Store and invite your inspection of my styles and stock. And guarantee prices as low or lower than any establishment of the kind in Western Allegan. . Nell Upson.

10-3-79 Miss Nell Upson has returned from Chicago with a full stock of fall millenery .Miss Upson would inform her patrons that she will have added facilities this fall in her business and desires a call from them at Their convenience (see Coates and Breuckman ads same date)

2-27-80 I am selling off my stock of millenery goods at cost, and have some bargains in laces, ribbons, and feathers. I am going out of the business and wilt sell cheap. Nellie Upson

4-9-80 Married in Holland, Mr Erastes D. Billings prop of the Saugatuck House, and Miss Nellie Upson of Douglas.

 

3-1-78 1st reference 9-13-78

A. W. WALKER & BRO. [Located in lower level of Paynes Grist mill]

3-1-70 Block adv. -- Horrible Crash! A. W. Walker and Bro. are prepared to do all kinds of carpenter and joiner work in all its branches at panic prices. We mean business. Give us a call. at the Douglas Basket Factory.

11-1-78 We understand Messrs Newton and Walker are fitting up the Hall of the Eagle House in view of having dramatic entertainments through the winter

10~31-79 A. W. Walker of Douglas has bought the Nichols Building and is fitting it up for a residence.

10-6-82 1st reference - Harness and Barber Shop --Douglas --3-30-03

C. B. WALLER - DEALER IN HARNESSES, SADDLERY, HARDWARE. And everything else in that line.

DOUGLAS, MICH. Good Harness Oil constantly on hand. Mr Knickerbocker will remain and will do all kinds of repairing. In connection with the Harness Shop will be found a first class Barber Shop, to which 1 shall devote my personal attention.

 

1st reference 4-5'-78 to 10-10-79 rs 10-1-80 to 8-11-82

 

GEORGE WALZ -MEAT MARKET

9-26-79 The Morey Bros have leased the City Meat Market of Geo WaIz and will also run the Washington and Douglas Markets. This firm, in the year that they have done business here, have always been known as fair dealers and deserve the large share of patronage which they are getting.

10-3-79 Geo Walz and family are to live in Douglas after the 16th of this month

8-13-80 Geo Walz is back at his old place in the City Market, serving his customers with the same good nature as of old.

3-18-81 Geo Walz has bought the lots next to Bird and Cos drug store Douglas, of R. M. Moore and will put up a meat market on them this spring.

3-25-81 Walz has broken ground for his new meat market.

4-15-81 Geo. Walz and J. Francis are out with new market wagons painted to the last degree of resplendency.

4-22-8l Geo Walz brother is here and will take charge of the Douglas market for him.

5-20-81 The Douglas Meat Market of Walz Bros is in full blast with C. Walz in charge. It presents a very cleanly appearance, and is favorably located.

8-12-81 The Walz Market in Douglas, was not closed because it was not well supplied, but because the intensely hot weather made it impossible to keep meat without a refrigerator or meat room. As soon as the weather moderates the market will be again opened. Until that time my wagon will supply customers regularly. Geo Walz.

1-20-82 Geo Walz has sold the City Market to C. Higley.

2-10-82 GeoWalz has sold his place known as the Bond lot, to his brother,Chas Walz, the proprietor of the Douglas market.

2-17-82 The cleanest meat market we have seen lately is kept by Chris Walz and is known as the Douglas Market.

2-17-02 Blk Adv. - WALZ is again in business for himself at the City Meat Market . Farmers here is the place to dispose of your livestock and farm produce at the most advantageous prices . Citizens Here is the place to buy your Meats Cheap for Cash.! [See 8-25-82 C.Higley Adv]

9-15-82 Chris Walz, the butcher, is going to Englewood, Ill, next week, so says Dame Rumor. [Douglasj

7-29-71 1st reference 12-2-71

E.WEVER -D0UGLAS MEAT MARKET, Powers' building

7-29-71 A new meat market has been opened in the Powers Building where everything fresh and good in the meat and vegetable line will be furnished at reasonable prices. A wagon will visit Saugatuck every morning (Sundays excepted ) to supply the people of that place. E Wever

 

7-16-68 to 12-19-68

WOODHULL and BROS. --Dry Goods and Groceries, Opposite School, Douglas

10-1-70 Polls will be open at 9am in Woodhulls Store, Douglas, D. C. Putnam clerk

-

BUSINESS DIRECTORY 1879

J. N. Daniels ; Boot and Shoemaker Washington street.

L. Ewald, Tailor . Shop on Washington street.

N. C. Firman, Justice of the Peace, Office at Residence

Thomas Gray, General Merchant, corner Center and Washington sts

Gray & Crouse, Dealers in Lumber, etc. Office in Grays' Store

Hutchinson Bros. and Co., Proprietors of the Douglas Flouring Mills and Manufacturers of Apple Barrels, staves, etc.

J, Kirby, Harness maker.

J. Kibby, Proprietor of the Douglas House, corner Center and Washington sts

H. Lord, Cabinetmaker

Mrs L. H. . McDonald and Co., milliners and dressmakers, Center St

D. McLean, Physician, Surgeon and proprietor of the Douglas Drug Store

H. B. Moore, Manufacturer of and Dealer in Lumber, shingles, lath, etc.

D. Morey, proprietor of the Douglas Meat Market . Fremont street.

C. W. Newton, General Painter, Shop over Takken Bros and Co carriage works . Washington street.

D.C. Putman, Postmaster and General Merchant, Center St.

Samuel Reed, Blacksmith, gives particular attention to horseshoeing

Geo.H. Thomas, Wagonmaker. Shop near Reeds' Blacksmith shop

Takken Bro and Co., proprietors of the Douglas Carriage Works and general blacksmiths. Washington street.

C. C. Wallin and Sons, Proprietor of the Wallin Tannery, Saugatuck, and the Douglas Tannery. Douglas Office at Wallin Tannery

Wm Weed, proprietor of the Douglas Basket Factory. Planing and general woodwork.

W. A. Woolworth, Attorney at Law and real estate and insurance agent. Office in Woodhull building, Center street.

6-1-77 to 10-31-79

DR. MACLEAN -- PHYSICIAN

10-25-78 Dr MacLean has the building that originally stood at the foot of Center street moved up neat his residence and is fitting it up for a drug store.

4-11-79 John Kirby is fitting up the building formerly occupied by Dr. MacLean, as a drug store, for a harness shop.

5-2-79 Doc MacLean is doing considerable in the line of improvements in and around the Douglas Drug Store this spring. We notice a new sign,painted by that 'boss' artist, C. W. Newton, and inside the store new woodwork of ash and walnut being put in back of the drug counter makes rather a high-toned affair of those medicine shelves. The Doctor has lately added to his stock a full line of confectionery and canned goods.

7-18-79 Dr MacLean has fully determined to emigrate to California this fall. The Doctor is to take a seat in the Oakland Medical College as Professor of Physiology

8-1-79 All accounts due Dr MacLean, of Douglas, remaining unpaid after the 23d day of August 1879, will be placed in the hands of an attorney for collection.

C. E. Bird and Henry Bird have bought and taken possession of the Douglas Drug Store formerly owned by Dr MacLean. The new firm will be known as C. E. Bird and Co.

9-5-79 Dr MacLean and family leave for their future home in Oakland CA., the middle of the month.

9-12-79 Dr MacLean has sold his residence to Joseph Collins of Douglas ; consideration $500.

9-26-79 On Sun last Dr. MacLean cut the tonsils from the throat of Miss Newcomb, they having grown so large that it was difficult for her to breath.

9-26-79 Dr. MacLean was made the recipient of a very handsome gold headed cane by a few of the citizens of Douglas on Fri night last, Rev J. F. Taylor made the presentation in a neat title speech. The Dr was very much affected and could hardly express his gratitude, being wholly taken by surprise.

10-3-79 Notice .- All persons indebted to me will confer a favor by leaving the amount due with W. A. Woolworth at Douglas, Mi Dr. MacLean

8-13-b8 GERBER & SCHENK LUMBER and SHINGLE MILL,.

The mill of Gerber and Schenk had her main and excentric shafts broken the other day, occasioned by some flaw in the machinery. The damages are estimated to be about $300. The greatest possible haste is being exercised by the proprietors to replace the broken machinery, and the mill will be ready to operate in a few days.

5-15-69 Accident.- It is rumored that a young man working in the Gerber Mill in Douglas, was badly injured by running or falling against the drag saw while in motion, cutting his shoulder and knee.

7-17-69 Accident. -- An old gentlemen by the name of Wm Forrister, while at work in Gerbers Mill at Douglas, on Thurs. last had his hand, sawed so badly that amputation was necessary. The operation was performed by doctors McLean and Cook, and at last account the patient was doing well.

6-70 Mr. Edward Rogers was severely cut in the right foot, by the drag saw, last thurs. in Gerbers Mill. Dr. MacRae amputated the middle toe and it is thought another will have to be taken off'. We are sorry to hear Mr. Rogers held no accident policy

6-70 George Billings cut his finger in Gerbers Mill last Saturday on a saw.

7-30-70 Ore of the fireman working in Gerbers saw mill, tried to get up steam while the 'blow - off' valve was open . He succeeded in starting the rivets and opening the seams of the boiler, so that of took a week to repair the damages.

8-b-70 Gerbers saw mill started again Monday, the boiler having been thoroughly repaired

10-22-70 The Gerber Mill has been sold to H. B. Moore, who also bought 640 acres of pine of Dyckman, Hale and Co., of Schoolcraft

 

6-22-77 1st reference

GRAY & CRUISE MILL

10-22-70 Messrs. R, and E. Densmore sold their 2/3 interest in the butcher Mill property to T. Gray and J. F. Dickey. They sold that their whole attention may be given to the making of barrels, staves, and barrel heading.

4-26-73 Allegan Journal - A boy named Geo Sams employed in Gray & Cos mill to shovel sawdust from the saw, in some mysterious manner threw his hand against the saw, which lacerated the forefinger so as to render amputation necessary.

6-22-77 Gray and Crouse's mill shut dawn for the season the forepart of this week

10-19-77 Gray and Crouse have let the job of putting in 1,000,000 feet of lumber to R. Close

11-9-77 Robert Close has gone into the Pinewoods this week. He is bound to lumber, snow or no snow. Rob is a good lumberman and knows how to drive a job.

2-8-78 LACK OF SNOW ---We learn that the lumber companys have made good use of the little snow we have had. Gray and Crouses' team used the sleds till Monday noon. A few more such snow storms would help them out as the road beds are in excellent condition, and they would be used night and day. Two weeks good sleighing and the lags for our milts would be all banked.

4-12-78 Messrs' Gray and Crouse started up their mill on Wed last

4-19-78 Will Moore was badly hurt at one day last week, he was struck from a board flying from the edger.

5-17-78 Bird Firman returned from the horse sale at Holland last week with a span of horses that he pronounces A - #1. They are a fine looking team, price $200. Pete Lackey also brought back a heavy pair of Draught horses for the mill work around Crouse and Grays' Mill

3-28-79 Hutchinson Bros and Co have leased the LOWER MILL of Gray and Crouse and will run it this season.

8-8-79 The mill yard at Gray and Crouse mill looks this week as if an earthquake had struck it, sawdust and slabs being piled over it promiscuously . A bad place far a fire.

 

11-21-68

GERBER AND SON TANNERY-- Douglas

Gerber and Son have built in Douglas a large four story building for the purpose of drying their leather, which they manufacture at the rate of 400 sides a week

8-12-71 Tannery uses 1,500 cords of bark per year, tanning employs some 350 men

8-19-71 Water St graded from Gerber Tannery to the tap of the hill near Kirbys Harness Shop

 

1-30-69

C. C. WALLIN AND SONS TANNERY * 1st ref.

7-29-71 ref.

8-3-77 to 2-10-82

C. C. WALLLN AND SONS TANNERY

12-14-72 Allegan Journal -- The large tannery of C. C. Wallin & Sons, located near Saugatuck for twenty years, is but a small branch of that extensive firm. Their tannery is now engaged in making military leather, to be forwarded to their house at Salt Lake City. We hear from the Commercial that the firm loss quite a large stock of leather in the recent fire at Boston.

4.12-73 Mr Wallin has taken hold of the Plummerville tannery - Allegan Journal

8-3-77 The tannery shut down last Sat for repairs. It will commence operation in a short while

8-10-77 are making quite extensive improvements on their tannery north of the village. Among other things they are putting a new roof on the east side of the building and a stone foundation under the engine.

9-28-77 James McColgon, for a number of years, foreman of Wallins Tannery, has gone to Nebraska, we understand he talks of locating in that state.

9-28-77 C. C. Wallin and Sons take possession of the Douglas Tannery next week. We understand Mr Gerber will give his entire attention to his Tannery in Fremont

9-28-77 PORT SHELDON -- Capt. Upham informs us that the scow 'Flora' has, during the season, carried 187 cords of edgings from this place, to the pier at Holland, and brought to this port 500 cords of bark C. C. Wallin and Sons, from the lakeshore between Holland and Port Sheldon. She is towed by the tug Fanny Shriver, which makes her regular trips on time,and does this extra.

10-16-77 DOUGLAS -F. B. Wallin is overhauling his tannery and making extensive improvements

2-22-78 We judge that F. B. Wallins' bark men have given up all hopes of now by the way they have been rushing matters on wheels this week.

7-26-78 F. B. Wallin is going to build an addition to his tannery and rebuild the vats

10-4-78 Hon F. B. Wallin, Republican candidate for State Senator, will speak at Odd Fellows Hall next tues night, the 8th inst. Ladies are cordially invited and the best seats will be reserved for them!

12-20-78 The stmr Heath arrived from Chicago Wed. noon,bringing 700 hides for Wallins' Tanneries

7-28-79 F. B. Wallin is repairing his tannery in Douglas

9-12-79 Mr Wallin is giving the Douglas Tannery a thorough overhauling and repairing . He has new leeches completed and ready for the tan bark and is putting in new vats and flooring. The repairs he will put upon the building this fall will cost not less than $2,000.

10-3-79 F. B. Wallin has one oth the unhairing machines patented by Gerber and Sons of Fremont, put into his Saugatuck Tannery.

4-9-80 Mark Dorning, for the last 8years in the employ of F.B.Wallin, has moved upon his farm near Glenn n Ganges. Some way Wallin,s men have a knack of getting money ahead and investing in land. Several who have worked for him have bought farms in this vicinity.

5-7-80 Chas. T. Smith has traded his interest in the tug 'Shriver' and also his residence in the village for the Wallin property - with exception of the tannery - at Wa1limville. Mr Wallin intends to exchange the town property for the fine place belonging to Capt. J. N. Upham, which he will occupy as a residence, Capt Upham occupying the Smith property. It is rumored that Mr Wallin intends moving the Wallinville Tannery to Douglas as bark can be delivered there at much less cost than where the tannery now stands.

5-2l-80 F. B. Wallin has rented Mrs S. Johnsons' residence . Mrs Johnson will move into the House now occupied by Chas T. Smith.

10-29-88 J. D. Phillips who has recently bought an interest in the Douglas Tannery, has rented H. B. Morres' residence.

3-18-81 Rogers and Edgecombe have sold the tug 'O. C. Williams' to F.B.Wallin She willl be used in the bark trade. Consideration $5,200.

4-15-81 The tug Williams took her first load of bark this spring to WALLIN AND PHILLIPS TANNERY Douglas, last Thursday.

6-17-81 F. B.Wallin informs us that the Grand Rapids Eagle is a little premature in announcing his plans of removal from Saugatuck. He tells us that the firm of C.C.Wallins and Sons were offered a tannery site in Grand Rapids at m figure that would make the buying a good investment; and with a view to future possibilities, they went before the city fathers before buying, and had granted them the permission to erect a tannery upon the lots should they desire to do so. The question of their tanneries in Allegan County being removed is yet in the future.

7-2-81 F. B. Wallin will begin the construction of a tannery at Grand Rapids in October, he has bought a residence there also.

9-16-81 Ref to Wallin and Phillips hauling tanbark in Douglas City Council minutes.

10-21-81 F. B. Wallin and family have permanently removed to Grand Rapids.

9-15-82 Mr. T. Phillips, who has been here for some time managing the Douglas tannery, in which he holds an interest, has determined to remove his family to Grand Rapids. Mr Phillips w,ill make weekly business trips here during the winter.

9-29-82 A Card of Thanks .-- Mr Editor:-- We wish through the columns of your paper to express our sincere thanks to friends and neighbors, as also the Saugatuck Fire Department for their efforts in our behalf during the fires that have occurred in our absence. Wallin & Phillips

9-29-82 Two Fires in Douglas .~~Just after finishing the printing of our edition last Friday morning, we were startled by the continual blowing of whistles in Douglas, which at once told us there was a fire . By a spark from the smokestack the barn belonging to Wallin and Phillips tannery, had been set fire. All efforts to save the structure proved futile, and it, with the fine horse of Mr Phillips became prey to the devouring element. Mr John Slighter sustained severe and painful burns on his hands, face, and shoulders in his endeavors to save the horse. From the effects of which he is still unable to work. The loss is put down at $500, as $300 would not have bought the horse.

Tuesday morning about l1 o'clock the alarm of fire was again sounded,and the skies were dark with vast volumes of black smoke mingled with streaks of lurid red flame. It was found 1o be the drying house connected with the tannery of Wallin and Phillips, and owing to the great headway it had gained before being discovered, it was entirely consumed, together with a trifle over 1,340 sides of leather . Fortunately the wind was easterly thus driving the heat and flames away from the tannery proper, which was the only thing that saved it, there being no fire apparatus in Douglas, and by the time the Saugatuck Fire Co arrived upon the grounds the dry house was in ruins, all that remained to be done was to deaden it near the part uninjured, and let the rest smoulder . The loss is quite heavy being placed at $8,000 ;insurance light.

 

8-29-68 McDONALD FLOURING MILL -- DOUGLAS

Mr. McDonald, formerly of the firm McDonald and Putnam, is now building a Flouring Mill on the bank of the river at the east end of Center St. The dimensions of the mill are as follows: 26 feet by 36 feet ; two stories and a half high, with an engine room 20 feet square, two runs of stone, with capacity to grind 250 bushels per day. McDonald designs to have the mill in running condition by October next. This is surely an improvement to Douglas worthy of note, and will be a great accommodation to the farming community of that beautiful farming country all south of Douglas. The success of Mr. McDonalds' enterprise promises well.'

9-26-68 We notice that Mr. McDonalds grist mill has nearly reached completion, and ere many days will be in running order.

11-21-68 McDonalds' Flouring Mill will be ready far grinding next week.

4-3-69 Mr. McDonald is about to put a planing machine in his Grist mill

 

7-27-77

MOORES MILL - DOUGLAS

7-27-77 Harry Moores mill is running on full time now, and appears to be doing a good business. Hope there will be no more stops here

10-19-77 Large quantities of lumber will be cut at several mills next season, with a good prospect of remunerative prices. We learn that H. B. Moore will put in six million feet for his mill in Douglas.

12-7-77 H. B, Moore has gone into winter quarters in the lumber woods. He intends putting in a large stock of logs this winter

2-22-78 Anthony Slack has returned from the pinery this week, and reports that H. B. Moore Esq ., has nearly 2 million foot of logs banked.

4-12-78 H. B. Moore mill will start next week

5-24-78 Harry Moores shingle mill started up an Monday . We notice too a wise precaution he is taking in his mill yard in covering the sawdust, of which his dock is composed, to a depth o12 or 3 inches with sand. This greatly lessens the danger of fire

6-28-78 Accident . -- Wm J. Bailey, a driver on H. B. Moores' slab and sawdust "Omnibus Line", had no less than two runaways last week. That "moule" made the fastest time on record on the line, and the way sawdust and slabs were scattered was a caution to lookers on. Willie John advises the public to keep the track clear in the future, for fear of accidents

6-28-78 Allie Hames had a narrow escape at H. B. Moores' Mill on Wed. A load, of edgings was dumped upon him from the slide, cutting and bruising his head shockingly.

10-25-78 Harry Moores mill is running for a few weeks

3-21-79 The work in the lumber woods is nearly completed for this season. H. B. Moore has put in about 3,000,000 feet of logs on the Rabbit River; besides some on the Kalamazoo.

3-28-79 Harry Moore we understand, intends running his mill to its full capacity this summer.

4-11-79 Accident -- While 'Chub' Gleason and his brother were rafting logs for H. B. Moore on Tues of last week, by some carelessness the brother struck `Chubs' hand with an ax, cutting it severely.

4-18-79 Harry Moores mill sports a chime of three whistles this summer.

5-9-79 Harry Moore shipped his first cargo of lumber for this year on the schooner `Kitty Grant' May 1st

6-27-79 H. B. Moore with his entire crew adjourned to Rabbit River last Monday to take advantage of the late "raise" Mr Moore has a good many logs still in the Rabbit River but will be able by flooding, to get them out all right as they are below the dam.

8-15-79 It is rumored that H. B. Moore will remove his saw mill from Douglas to Fennville and convert it into a Gristmill.

2-20-80 R. M. Moore has gone east with a view of purchasing the Parsons lots of pine in Manlius.

3-5-80 " I want to buy 800,000 feet of good hemlock logs, delivered at my mill, or on the bank of the Kalamazoo river . H. B. Moore.

6-11-80 The Dutcher and Moore mills are both running when they can get men to run with. Men have never been so scarce since the war. It is almost impossible to get them here and wages are good too.

6-25-80 H. B. Moore is to leave Saugatuck soon [ Politics]

3-18-81 Mr John Askins, of Allegan, began work this week on the Moore Mill which will be thoroughly fitted up, the engine is to be turned halfway around, a new circular saw put in, and machinery for cutting long timbers for shipbuilding will be added.

4-22-81 Moores lumber mill will be ready to start up next week.

5-27-81 One of the men working in Moores mill at the time of the explosion claims that under providence he had a very narrow escape. N. B. He was at Takkens shop at the time.

5-27-81 The engine at Moores mill "ran away' last Monday, wrecking things through the mill badly. The accident took place while the engineer, George Kingsnorth, was at dinner, or just as he was returning from dinner, and it is due to his presence of mind that the damage was not much greater. He ran in while everything was dying and stopped the engine. A large iron drivewheel flew into fragments, a part going through the arch, but fortunately not injuring the boiler; the rest of the wheel went through the upper floor, rending timbers a foot square, and tearing up the floor for a space about fifteen feet square. The men were all in the mill at the time, with the exception of the engineer, and it seems almost miraculous that someone was not killed. Outsiders say it was as good as a circus to see the acrobatic feats performed by the men getting out of the mill. The engine was not materially injured; the heater was smashed and belting and wheels throughout the mill destroyed. C. W. Moore informs us that it will cost not less than a 1000 dollars to put the mill in running order again.

6-3-81 Moores mill will be ready to start up the first of next week.

11-4-81 Ed Kenter has bought the Williams Mill of R. M. Moore.

1-6-82 The lumber pile caught fire in R. M. Moores lumber yard last Friday, and was burning quite briskly when discovered . Had it gained a little more headway a general conflagration of the lumber and, gristmill, would have been the result. It is supposed to have caught from sparks from the Gristmill, hence the new spark catcher. [See Moore and Dutcher-Douglas Grist mill 1-6-82

4-21-82 Moores mill started this week [ Douglas]

 

R. M. MOORE

7-30-80 REFRIGERATOR R M. Moore has the timber out for a mammoth refrigerator to be built near the warehouse in Douglas. It will be used to store fruit, and we think our fruit growers will find of great particular value as they, in case of storms or when the markets are flooded in Chicago, can hold their fruit for a month and then ship it in as good a condition as when picked

1-7-81 R M. Moore has bought the lots known as the public square in Douglas

 

9-25-69 1st reference

DUTCHER MILL

9-10-70 Mr. Densmore has stopped running the Dutcher Saw Mill nights

10-22-70 Messrs. R and E. Densmore sold their 2/3 interest in the Dutcher Mill property to T. Gray and J. F. Dickey. They sold that their whole attention may be given to the making of barrels, staves, and barrel heading.[See - Densmore, Barber & Co.,Saugatuck]

4-8-71 The Dutcher Mill, owned by Thomas Gray and Co., began making lumber last morning, They will begin making shingles next Monday.

6-10-71 T. Gray and Co., began running their shingle mill nights, last week

7-29-71 Messrs Thomas Gray and Cos, mill in Douglas produces 6,000,000 ft lumber and 6,100,400 shingles annually, the mill is stocked by Mr T. B, butcher, possessor of large tracts of land to the northward

12-14-72 Allegan Journal - The Dutcher mill was laid up one week on account of sick horses.

1-16-80 J. Nies and H. Ebmeyer have purchased the Dutcher Mill property of J. S. Payne, and will stock it next summer.

2-27-80 H. Ebmeyer is repairing the Dutcher Mill in Douglas, and will commence work as soon as in full repair, the weather permitting,

4-9-80 John Nies has sold his mill property in Douglas to John Burns

4-9-80 The Dutcher Mill has changed hands 3 times this spring. It now belongs to Theo Caster of Salem, and H. Ebmeyer of Saugatuck. We learn that they will convert it into a Grist Mill at this point next fall.

4-16-80 R. B. Newnham obtruded his jolly visage into our office yesterday. He informs us that Theo Caster` of Salem, is the only and sole owner of the Old Dutcher Mill 'and as soon as this seasons sawing is through with,he will move it to Salem and convert it into a Grist and Shingle mill .We shall be sorry to see the old mill taken away, and wish that our report of last week was the correction.

6-11-80 The Dutcher and Moore mills are both running when they can get men to run with. Men have never been so scarce since the war. It is almost impossible to get them here and wages are good too.

11-5-80 The Old Dutcher Mill is being moved to Salem

12-3-80 Dick Roche and Albert Nysson took the job of moving the machinery of the Dutcher Mill to Salem, and the early snow just helped them out.

12-17-80 R. C. Brittain and G. T. have bought the Dutcher Mill property in Douglas,extending from a hundred feet north of the Douglas Grist mill, down the river to M.B.Spencers corner, below the bridge. This gives them an extended river frontage, suitable for any kind of manufacturing .We understand they will build a basket factory, packing house and warehouse just above the bridge during the coming season.

12-31-80 LUMBER FOR CASH. - For sale at the yard of the old Dutcher mill. Mr. Ed Binns has charge and can be found at the cooper shop. O. R. Johnson and Co.

6-3-81 G. T. Arnold and R. C. Brittain have sold Weed and Co., a site for their basket factory on the Dutcher mill lots.

6-10-81 The steam barge 'Hilton', loaded with ties at the Dutcher mill dock last Wed.

7-22-8l The scow Sea Bird loaded with ties at the Dutcher mill this week.

7-29-81 The Dutcher mill is being torn down by Weed and Co., to make room for their basket factory.

 

9-25-69 1st ref

DUTCHER and SPENCER WAREHOUSE

9~25 Fire. ~~~As we were on the point of going to press Friday afternoon, the blowing of boat and mill whistle denoted afire in the slabs near Dutchers Mill in Douglas. The wind was blowing strong at the time and the fire spread rapidly -the combined efforts of the citizens of bath this place and Douglas, not being able to stay its progress, until it had destroyed about 2500 cds of wood for Mr. Dutcher and M. B. Spencers warehouse. Entire loss by the fire will exceed $3000. We will endeavor to give a more elaborate description of the fire in our next issue. About midnight proceeding the afternoon of the fire, the different bells and whistles through this place and Douglas, gave the second alarm of fire, caused by the changing of the wind, so as to blow the fire that still remained from the fire in the afternoon, towards Dutchers Saw Mill, at once setting fire to the sawdust and rubbish setting about the mill. A large # of citizens from both places rushed to the scene of action, and by am extra effort saved the mill from being burned. A large amount of lumber from both fires was thrown into the river, but has since been removed and placed on the dock.. The railway and slides have been rebuilt and every thing is once more in running order. Mr. Dutchers loss and damage by the fire is about $2500, and M. B. Spencer about $500. The loss of property by fire ought to be a warning to our citizens to purchase a fire engine

 

12-25-1865 Selling at Cost. ~~Mr C. McDonald, merchant at Dudleyville, desirous of leaving that place, offers for sale his large stock, consisting of dry-goods, and groceries, at cost. People in that vicinity will do well to purchase of Mr. McDonald.

 

3-8-66 Johnatham Wade, of Dutcherville has sold his tavern with about one acre of land to Mr David Porter for$3000. MrPorter, with his amiable lady will undoubtedly keep a good house, worthy of public patronage.

******************************************************

Sources of following information MFS -May Francis Heath; AlCoHis. 1880 Allegan Co History; Harrison Hutchins Recollections o the Early Pioneers of Allegan County; JES, James Sheridan "Saugatuck Through The Years"

 

DUDLEYVILLE - DUTCHERVILLE

JES 1846 Robert McDonald bought Douglas property from M. B. Spencer and William Scovill

 

AlCoHis Douglas : William Bush had 1st store, Johnathan Wade built Douglas House.

 

JES 1851 Johnathan Wade bought property for a sawmill, S. of south end of Blue Star Hiway bridge. Wells and Johnson gave him financial backing to build the mill. Later mill bought by William Dutcher, then sold to Thomas Gray and James Crouse, evolved into the Douglas Basket :Factory. Wade built small house on west end of Center street in Douglas, also a boarding house close to the mill. Wade platted a district south of Center street which he called `Dudleyville in honor of his brother Dudley Wade. When William Dutcher arrived, with his sons George and Thomas Benton, and daughter, Elizabeth, he bought land north of Center street and called it Dutcherville.

 

AlCoHis ? Wades mill bgt by William F. Dutcher

 

A1CoHis 1851 A mill was built at site of Douglas where basket factory was, by Johnathan Wade as the nucleus of village he was promoting on south side of river.

 

JES 1854 ? D. C. Putnam goes into business as General Merchant - Store on S. W. corner of Center street where Douglas Village Offices are located . Putnam died in 1894 running business for 40 years

 

AlCoHis 1860's Crawford McDonald built grist mill at Douglas.

 

JES 1861 - 2d Sawmill in Douglas was built by a man named Conger, some say it was erected by H. F. Marsh, regardless of the initial ownership it soon passed to H. D. Moore of Saugatuck, it was located on the river bank south of foot of Center Street.

 

AlCoHis 1861 Another mill built on east side of Douglas plat.

 

JES 1863 Daniel Gerber purchased land from Nelson Wade, younger brother of Johnathan Wade, on Tannery Creek . Tannery built and burnt the first year. Sole leather made there.

 

JES --1868 Crawford McDonald built Grist mill, 26x36, 2 1/2 stories high, at east end of Center street. South of H. D. Moores mill. It had a steam engine room 20x20 . Mill had two runs of stone, with a 280 bushel a day capacity. Mill operated for 20 years burnt in 1890`s and not rebuilt.

 

JES - 1870 Gerber sold Douglas tannery to C. C. Wallin and Sons, Gerber secured interest in mill at Mill Point after selling tannery.

 

JES -1870 Johnathan Wade sold Douglas House to Jervis Kibby, burnt in 1920's

 

JES Captain Reid sold basket factory to Joshua Weed and son William, later was called William Weed and Co.

Hutchins 1876 Frank Weed worked for Capt Reid at Douglas Basket Factory.

Hutchins William Weed with Joshua Weed bought Factory for 3-4-thousand and moved it to present site, where present factory was built after buying out Ried.

 

AlCoHis 1872 Two general merchants, Putnam and Thomas Gray . Lumbering, Thomas Gray, R M. Moore, R. Scales. Grist Mill, J. S. Payne 1860's D. Gerber and sons started tannery.

 

JES 1874 --McDonald sold to J. S. Payne and Co ., later sold to Thomas Benton Dutcher who owned it when it burned. Robert Moore was partner with Dutcher in the mill.

 

JES 1878 Henry McDonald established a store in Douglas, ran till 1926 - run by sons Archie and Roy Archie died 1928. Roy was postmaster 1919-1934. Continued to run store till mid 30's

 

JES - 1880 Tannery closed Wallin moves to Grand Rapids.

 

JES -1894 Elmer Weed purchased large share of BASKET FACTORY from father and brother . [E. E. Weed and Co.]

 

JES -1942 - Putnam's Store burns

JES 1927 Basket Factory burns - Box and Crate Factory started by William Devine on the site, ran 10 years. Devine made and sold cement blocks with Fred Groth and Sundin Bros Lumber and Coal Yard.

 

JES @ Notes -- Nelson Wade home on Wall street east of Congregational Church

Ben Wiegert Grocerie - Corner Center and Main streets

Harold VanSyckel Grocery on N.W. corner Center and Washington streets George WaIz - store on N.E. corner Main and Center streets

 

Postmasters : D. C. Putnam 1866 -1885 Frank Kirby 1888 Geo W. Gill 1888-89 Martin Gray 1889-91 Henry Bird Jr. 1891-96 Chas Powers 1896-1900 Frank Kerr -1900-1919 Roy McDonald 1919-1934 John Campbell 1934-1962 Gerald Bekken 1962 -1982

 

MFH - Harry Moores mill formerly Gerber Mill at Douglas

Hutchins "The Gray and Co., mill of Douglas, fromerly the Dutcher Mill"

Hutchins " H. B. Moore mill previously owned by Daniel Gerber"

Hutchins Wade mill built in 1851, sold to Dutcher, sold to Gray &Crouse, in late 70's turned into maufactory of fruit packages"

Hutchins" 1861 Mill built by Conger later owned by H. B. Moore"